Bay Area LASER Presenters

Leonardo Art Science Evenings

San Francisco, Silicon Valley and Berkeley LASERs


Past and future program


Biographies

(As they were the day they presented at a LASER)
  • Dor Abrahamson is currently Assistant Professor of Cognition and Development in UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Education. Abrahamson researches mathematical intuition, reasoning, and learning, the relations among them, and the roles that artifacts can play in facilitating deep conceptual understanding and procedural fluency. Abrahamson holds a Ph.D. in the Learning Sciences (Northwestern University) and an M.A. in Cognitive Psychology (Tel Aviv University). He is a recipient of a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. Kim Anno has been a professor at the California College of the Arts since 1996. She is a painter, photographer, and video artist whose work has been collected by museums nationally and shown internationally, recently she had a solo exhibition at the Marcia Wood Gallery in Atlanta,and at the Goethe Institute, Johannesburg in July 2012. She has also presented a two channel screening and live concert with composer, David Coll at the Kala Art Institute in 2013 of "Water City, Berkeley". Anno has had exhibitions and screenings at in three continents. She was awarded a fellowship by the Zellerbach Foundation and the Open Circle Foundation in 2012-13, the Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation Purchase Award and the Eureka Foundation's Fleishhaker Fellowship. Her recent interests and expertise has been in the intersection of art and science, particularly in aesthetic issues surrounding climate change, water,and adaptation. She has been granted a Sustainable Arts residency at Kala Art Institute in support of her new interdisciplinary work. She is currently at work on a multi chapter intersdisciplinary video work: Men and Women in Water Cities, with in 2013 Water City:Berkeley in the filming process.
  • Luca Antonucci is a practicing artist and co-founder of Colpa Press. He received his MFA from San Francisco Art Institute in 2010 and is currently in an Artist in Residence at the Kala Art Institute for Printmaking. He resides in San Francisco and was part of a group show at the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery in January. His frequent collaborations with Daniel Small led to their project First Light.
  • Mark Applebaum is Associate Professor of Composition and Theory at Stanford University. His solo, chamber, choral, orchestral, operatic, and electroacoustic work has been performed throughout the United States, Europe, Africa, and Asia with notable premieres at the Darmstadt summer sessions. Since 1990 Applebaum has built electroacoustic instruments out of junk, hardware, and found objects for use as both compositional and improvisational tools. Mousetrap Music (1996) and The Bible without God (2005), CDs of sound-sculpture improvisations can be heard on the Innova label. Also on Innova is The Janus ReMixes: Exercises in Auto-Plundering, a CD of eleven electronic works whose source material corresponds exclusively to recordings of the eleven acoustic compositions that constitute his Janus Cycle (1992-1996), as well as Intellectual Property, a CD of hybrid acoustic and electronic works. His orchestral music can be heard on the Innova CD Martian Anthropology; solo pieces appear on the Innova CD Disciplines; and chamber works appear on the Innova CDs 56 1/2 ft. and Asylum, and on the Tzadik CD Catfish. In 1997 Applebaum received the American Music Center's Stephen Albert Award and an artist residency fellowship at the Villa Montalvo artist colony in Northern California. Applebaum is also active as a jazz pianist and builds electroacoustic instruments out of junk, hardware, and found objects for use as both compositional and improvisational tools. His music can be heard on recordings on the Innova, Tzadik, Capstone, and SEAMUS labels. Prior to his current appointment, he taught at UCSD, Mississippi State University, and Carleton College. Additional information is available at www.markapplebaum.com.
  • Salma Arastu, a native of India's Rajasthan, has been creating and exhibiting her paintings internationally since the 1970s. Her work with continuous and lyrical line is influenced by her native culture and her residence after marriage in Iran and Kuwait before coming to the US in 1987. Born into the Sindhi, Hindu tradition in her native India, she later embraced Islam through her marriage. At birth, Ms. Arastu was given the life-defining challenge of a left hand without fingers. Seeing the unity of an all-encompassing God, she was able to transcend the barriers often set-forth in the traditions of religion, culture and the cultural perceptions of handicap. She has almost 40 solo shows to her credit, won several awards including East Bay Community's fund for artists in 2012, three works in public places and two books published with her poems and paintings. She is the author of two books: "The Lyrical Line: Embracing All and Flowing" and "Turning Rumi: Singing Verses of Love Unity and Freedom" (2012).
  • Deborah Aschheim makes drawings, sculptures and installations that try to give form to invisible worlds of the mind and brain. her recent work exploring the subject of memory has led her to collaborate with musicians and neuroscientists on projects that are a mixture of science and poetry. she has exhibited recent projects at the Armory Center and the Pasadena Museum in Pasadena, ca; at the Austin Museum in Texas; the weatherspoon museum in Greensboro, North Carolina; Laumeier Sculpture Park in St. Louis and the mattress factory in Pittsburgh. Aschheim is the Hellman visiting artist at the memory and aging center in the neurology department of UC San Francisco.
  • Jesse Austin and Charles Lee are members of the architecture collective BIOS. Living organisms are distinguished from inanimate objects in that they exhibit metabolism, reproduction, and response to stimuli. Living organisms communicate: depending on feedback to find optimal patterns for their continued existence. They self-organize, living in negative entropy. As designers we find the patterns of life and use them to negotiate the layering of diverse parameters and constraints inherent in architectural design.
  • Lucia Ayala, art and astronomy historian, is currently a postdoc researcher at the Office for History of Science and Technology in the University of California, Berkeley. She accomplished her binational PhD at the Humboldt University of Berlin (Germany) and the University of Granada (Spain). She deals with historical as well as contemporary contexts, since her main research field is the visual history of astronomy from early modern period until current astrophysics. She is a team member of Fluid Skies, a collaborative project developed together with the astrophysicist Jaime Forero and the artist Yunchul Kim.
  • Henrik Bennetsen is the CEO of Katalabs and maintains a strong interest in 3D collaborative spaces and open source technology. In a previous life Henrik was a professional musician and still has a strong side interest in creative self expression augmented by technology.
  • Stacey Bent is a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University and the co-director of the Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion. Her research focuses on semiconductor processing, surface science, nanotechnology, and interface engineering. Her group studies new materials and processes for next generation solar cells, fuel cells and catalysts. Bent has received several awards including the Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2006 and the Allan V. Cox Medal for Faculty Excellence in Fostering Undergraduate Research in 2013, and she is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and the American Vacuum Society.
  • Uwe Bergmann is a Senior Staff Scientist at SLAC and the Director (interim) of the Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first X-ray free electron laser. His research activities have focused on the development and application of novel x-ray spectroscopic techniques. His scientific interests include studies of the structure of water and aqueous solution, active centers in metalloproteins in particular the photosynthetic splitting of water, hydrocarbons and fossil fuels and imaging of ancient documents and fossils. Bergmann has done his graduate research at the National Synchrotron Light Source and since worked at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, and now the Linac Coherent Light Source.
  • Terry Berlier is an interdisciplinary artist who works primarily with sculpture and expanded media. Her work is often kinetic, interactive and/or sound based and focuses on everyday objects, the environment, ideas of nonplace/place and queer practice. She has exhibited in solo and group shows both nationally and internationally. Her work has been reviewed in the BBC News Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle and in the book `Seeing Gertrude Stein' published by University of California Press. Her work is in several collections including the Progressive Corporation in Cleveland Ohio, Kala Art Institute in Berkeley California and Bildwechsel Archive in Berlin Germany. She has received numerous residencies and grants including the Zellerbach Foundation Berkeley, Arts Council Silicon Valley Artist Fellowship, Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research Fellow at Stanford University, Recology San Francisco, Hungarian Multicultural Center in Budapest Hungary, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception in San Francisco, Arts Council Silicon Valley Artist Fellowship, California Council for Humanities California Stories Fund and the Millay Colony for Artists. She currently is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University. Her exhibition opens October 9 on the Stanford campu: details.
  • Ruzena Bajcsy is director of the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) at UC Berkeley
  • Ashley Bellouin's work explores the merging of sound art, electro-acoustic composition, and instrument building. She focuses on the studies of sonology, psychoacoustics, and the interaction between sound and architecture. Her compositions emphasize and exploit the sonic potential contained within a single musical gesture, regularly using electronics to develop latent qualities. Spatialization, beat frequencies, auditory illusions, and microtonal tunings are frequent compositional tools. Ashley holds an MFA in Electronic Music from Mills College, where she was awarded the Frog Peak Collective Experimental Music Award. She has presented her work at the San Francisco Electronic Music Festival, Soundwave ((5)) Festival, the 26th Annual SEAMUS National Conference, the San Francisco Tape Music Festival, UC Santa Cruz, and Stanford University, among other venues. She has additionally been awarded a YBCAway grant from Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and has held residencies at the Paul Dresher Ensemble Artist Residency Center, the UC Berkeley Center for New Media, and the Djerassi Resident Artists Program. Ashley previously worked for Buchla Electronic Musical Instruments and currently works for Dave Smith Instruments in San Francisco.
  • Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik is an interdisciplinary artist and educator born and raised in the suburbs of Los Angeles to Indian and Japanese Colombian parents. After receiving her B.A. in Studio Art from Scripps College, Sita moved to the Bay Area where she holds an M.F.A. from California College of the Arts and an M.A. in Visual and Critical Studies. She is a lecturer at UC Merced and RayKo Photo Center. Sita has collaborated with organizations such as Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, The San Jose Museum of Art, SomArts, 18 Reasons, 826 Valencia, Asterisk SF, Whitman College, Cal-State Fullerton, Stanford University, and the Future Food House in Rotterdam. She has been the art features editor for Hyphen magazine, writer for Art Practical, and a board member at Kearny Street Workshop. She is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute for Art and Olfaction in Los Angeles and a Lucas Artist Program Resident at Montalvo. Her favorite spice is cardamom.
  • Paula Birnbaum (USF) is Associate Professor and Program Director of Art History/Arts Management in the Department of Art + Architecture of the University of San Francisco. She will serve as Academic Director of the new Master of Arts Program in Museum Studies beginning in August of 2013. Paula is a specialist in modern and contemporary art and holds a doctorate in Art History from Bryn Mawr College. She is a former Fulbright Scholar and fellow at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Stanford University. In 2008 Paula received the University of San Francisco, Faculty Union (USFFA) Distinguished Teaching Award (university wide award) and enjoys teaching a variety of classes including Museum Studies - History and Theory, Modern and Contemporary Art, European Art 1900-1945 and Women and Art, as well as curating exhibitions in USF's Thacher Gallery. She also runs the Arts Management Internship Program, and has enjoyed working closely since 2003 with educators from Bay Area Museums including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, SFMOMA, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, among many others. Her research focuses on the impact of gender and ethnicity on modern and contemporary women artists and their self-representation, as well as the role of gender and sexuality in museum exhibitions. She has recently completed two books: Women Artists in Interwar France: Framing Femininities (Ashgate), and a co-edited anthology with Anna Novakov, Essays on Women's Artistic and Cultural Contributions 1919-1939 (Edwin Mellen). Paula's articles appear in a variety of journals including the Art Journal, Aurora, Woman's Art Journal, and The Royal Academy of Art Magazine.
  • Sam Bower is co-founder and executive director of greenmuseum.org, an online museum of environmental art, launched in 2001. Prior to this, Sam created environmental art for 8 years as part of a San Francisco Bay Area collaborative art group known as Meadowsweet Dairy. He helped found Cellspace, a non-profit community art space in San Francisco, and Co-Directed Crucible Steel Gallery. Sam has worked as a solo artist, puppeteer, web designer, in advertising, events planning and the environmental non-profit sector in the United States and in Ecuador.
  • Robert Buelteman has published 4 books of photographs and thirteen limited-edition portfolios of his work. He has been honored with three residencies at the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, the subject of his monograph Eighteen Days in June (2000), as well as a three year residency at the Santa Fe Institute. He is currently working on a new collection of images as a guest of Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. His work is found in the permanent collections of he Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the Santa Fe Institute, Yale University Art Museum, Stanford University and numerous corporate and private collections as well.
  • Patricia Burchat (Stanford Physics Dept) is the Gabilan Professor of Physics at Stanford University. She grew up in a very large family in a very small town in Canada. She studies the Universe at both the smallest and the largest scales, using accelerators to probe the elementary particles and the fundamental interactions, and telescopes to investigate the cosmological evolution of the Universe. In both cases, she asks similar questions: What is the Universe made of? What are the laws of physics that govern the constituents of the Universe? Burchat is part of an international collaboration developing a telescope that will provide the best census of the Universe to date -- the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Her team will use the gravitational bending of light by "dark matter" to study the evolution of "dark energy", shedding light on the identity of these components that make up the majority of the density of the Universe. Professor Burchat is passionate about teaching and instilling enthusiasm for science in her students. At Stanford, she has received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Walter J. Gores Award for excellence in teaching. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and has received a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is currently Chair of the National Organizing Committee for the APS Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics.
  • Sarah Cahill is a pianist who has commissioned, premiered, and recorded numerous compositions for solo piano, and has performed chamber music with several chamber groups including the New Century Chamber Orchestra and the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. She has recorded for the New Albion, CRI, New World, Other Minds, Tzadik, Albany, Cold Blue, and Artifact labels. She has a weekly radio show, Then & Now, in San Francisco. She is on the faculty of the San Francisco Conservatory and curates a monthly series of new music concerts at the Berkeley Art Museum. Her most recent project, A Sweeter Music, premiered in the Cal Performances series in Berkeley in January 2009 and continued to New Sounds Live at Merkin Hall, Rothko Chapel, and venues around the country, with newly commissioned works on the theme of peace by Terry Riley, Meredith Monk, Yoko Ono, Frederic Rzewski, etc. Composers who have dedicated works to her include John Adams, Terry Riley, Frederic Rzewski, Pauline Oliveros, Annea Lockwood, and Evan Ziporyn.
  • Jim Campbell, who studied Mathematics and Engineering at the MIT, is an electronic artist whose work is included in the collections of several museums around the world. In 1992 he created one of the first permanent public interactive video artworks in the USA. He has lectured on interactive media art at many Institutions throughout the world. As an engineer he holds almost twenty patents in the field of video image processing.
  • Helena Carmena, a former science educator, is the Manager of Teacher Services at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. She has been active in curriculum development for use in the museum and classroom setting and has delivered numerous inquiry-based educational programs for children and adults. Helena has worked with many organizations to develop multi-disciplinary curricula. The most recent project has been focused on art, science, and literacy integration in collaboration with the de Young Fine Arts Museum and the San Francisco Unified School District.
  • Chris Chafe is a composer/ cellist / music researcher with an interest in computer music composition and interactive performance. He has been a long-term denizen of the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Stanford University where he directs the center and teaches computer music courses. His doctorate in music composition was completed at Stanford in 1983 with prior degrees in music from the University of California at San Diego and Antioch College. Two year-long research periods were spent at IRCAM, and the Banff Center for the Arts developing methods for computer sound synthesis based on physical models of musical instrument mechanics. Two recent discs of his works are available from Centaur Records.
  • Adrian David Cheok, born and raised in Australia, is a Full Professor at Keio University, Graduate School of Media Design. He is Founder and Director of the Mixed Reality Lab, Singapore. He was formerly Associate Professor in the National University of Singapore. He has previously worked in real-time systems, soft computing, and embedded computing in Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs, Japan. He has been working on research covering mixed reality, human-computer interfaces, wearable computers and ubiquitous computing, fuzzy systems, embedded systems, power electronics. He was invited to exhibit for two years in the Ars Electronica Museum of the Future, launching in the Ars Electronica Festival 2003. His works "Human Pacman", "Magic Land", and "Metazoa Ludens", were each selected as one of the worlds top inventions by Wired and invited to be exhibited in Wired NextFest 2005 and 2007. He was awarded the Hitachi Fellowship, the A-STAR Young Scientist of the Year Award, and the SCS Singapore Young Professional of the Year Award. He was invited to be the Singapore representative of the United Nations body IFIP SG 16 on Entertainment Computing and the founding Chairman of the Singapore Computer Society Special Interest Group on Entertainment Computing. He was awarded an Associate of the Arts award by the Minister for Information, Communications and the Arts, Singapore. He was awarded as Fellow in Education, World Technology Network. He was awarded a Microsoft Research Award for Gaming and Graphics. He received the C4C Children Competition Prize for best interaction media for children, the Integrated Art Competition Prize by the Singapore Land Transport Authority, Creativity in Action Award, and a First Prize Nokia Mindtrek Award. He received a First Prize in the Milan International InventiON competition. He is winner of Keio University Gijyuju-sho award, awarded for the best research of the year in Keio University, Japan's oldest university. He received an SIP Distinguished Fellow Award which honors legendary leaders whose illustrious lives have positively influenced lives across generations and communities around the globe. He was awarded Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. This honor is bestowed each year by the World Economic Forum to recognize and acknowledge the top young leaders from around the world for the professional accomplishments, commitment to society and potential to contribute to shaping the future of the world. He is Editor in Chief of the academic journals: Transactions on Edutainment (Springer) and ACM Computers in Entertainment. He is of Associate Editor of Advances in Human Computer Interaction, International Journal of Arts and Technology (IJART), Journal of Recent Patents on Computer Science, The Open Electrical and Electronic Engineering Journal, International Journal of Entertainment Technology and Management (IJEntTM), Virtual Reality (Springer-Verlag), International Journal of Virtual Reality, and The Journal of Virtual Reality and Broadcasting.
  • Luciano Chessa is a composer, conductor, pianist, and musical saw/Vietnamese dan bau soloist who has been active in Europe, the U.S., and Australia. Recent premieres include a large orchestral work commissioned by the Orchestra Filarmonica of Torino "Ragazzi Incoscienti Scarabocchiano Sulla Porta Di Un Negozio Fallito" "TomBoy" for piano and a video by Terry Berlier, and "Movements", a multimedia work for 16mm film, dan bau and amplified film projectors produced in collaboration with filmmaker Rick Bahto. Chessa has just composed "Come un'Infanzia", a guitar + string quartet piece for the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, and is collaborating with performance artist Kalup Linzy and the Ensemble Parallele on an opera commissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to be premiered at YBCA in August 2011. As a music historian Chessa has written "Luigi Russolo, Futurist. Noise, Visual Arts, and the Occult" (UC Press, 2012). In 2009 Chessa supervised the first reconstruction of Russolo's "intonarumori" orchestra. His recordings include: Humus Destination X (1997), Entu (2000), Tryptique pour Gerard (2008), Peyrano (2008) Money is Money and Time is Time (2008) the dvd Tom's Heart (2008) The Orchestra of Futurist Noise Intoners Vol. 1 (Sub Rosa, 2012).
  • Irene Chien is a PhD candidate in Film and New Media at UC Berkeley. She writes and teaches about race and gender at the intersection of cinema and new media, including a column "Camera Ludica" for Film Quarterly.
  • Born and raised in Bombay, India, Chhoti Rao has been a resident of San Francisco since late 2007. She has attended Universities in the US and the UK here she studied History, Art History and Decorative Arts. Currently she is a Master's candidate in Museum Studies at the University of San Francisco and is driven by her passion for the visual arts, its practice, presentation and interpretation across the globe. With fifteen plus years in the art industry spent as an auction house manager and art consultant she is now shifting her focus from art sales to art appreciation in the international museum field. Implementing this transition by volunteering at the Asian Art Museum, the Contemporary Jewish Museum and interning at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. In 2011 Ms. Rao worked closely with the Visual Arts team at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts to develop and produce the exhibition, The Matter Within, showcasing contemporary art of India. She has also served on the special events committee of ArtSpan, a Bay Area non-profit organization supporting local artists and has worked extensively with the SFMOMA's auxiliary group SECA (Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art). Her current projects include compiling an important private collection database, speaking engagements on contemporary art from India, contributing to a book on art and globalization in the 21st century, organizing art and museum tours in San Francisco and working on her Master's thesis involving Exhibition Histories: Representing the Other.
  • Grisha Coleman, assistant professor of Movement, Computation and Digital Media at the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and School of Dance at Arizona State University works as a dancer, composer and media artist in performance and experiential media systems and is currently a resident at the Montalvo Arts Center in Silicon Valley. She has created large scale works for a variety of residencies and venues, e.g. the site-specific sound/kinetic installation for public interaction and participation "Reach, Robot", commissioned by the Robotics Institute.
  • Lia Cook, Visual Artist, Professor of Art, California College of the Arts works in a variety of media combining weaving with painting, photography and digital technology. Her current practice explores the sensuality of the woven image and embodied memories of touch and cloth. Working together with neuroscientists she investigates the nature of the emotional response to the tactile quality of woven faces and uses the laboratory experience with both process and tools to stimulate new work. Lia Cook exhibits her work nationally and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include: "Neuro Nets + Net Works" Perimeter Gallery, Chicago "Icones Jacquards" Les Drapiers , Liege, Belgium and "Weaving and Innovation: Digital Fibers Converse with Neural Networks" at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her works are in the permanent collection of the MOMA, NY; Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, Cooper Hewitt; Museum of Arts and Design, NY; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Cleveland Museum of Art; Smithsonian Museum, Washington DC; The National Collection, France; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Musee Bellerive, Switzerland; National Gallery of Australia; Zhejiang Art Museum and the National Silk Museum, Hangzhou China
  • Alan Cooper is an emeritus scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey and consulting professor at Stanford. He has 28 years experience working on Antarctic studies and heads the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research under the 1959 Antarctic Treaty. He has published more than 250 research papers. Alan is also co-concertmaster of the California Pops Orchestra and performs with the Left Bank trio and Fiume di Musica.
  • Anna Couey works at the intersection of art, communications, information and social justice, using participatory media tools and story-collecting methods to re-imagine and restructure power. During the 1980s-1990s, she helped develop art telecommunications projects such as the Art Com Electronic Network and Arts Wire, as well as producing temporary cross-cultural communications events as social sculpture. Since the mid-1990's, Anna has applied social sculpture strategies outside the art world, collaborating with alternative media makers; librarians, educators, and youth; and poor and working class communities of color organizing for social justice. Her communication sculptures have been exhibited at digital art festivals internationally, including ISEA and SIGGRAPH.
  • Mathias Crawford is a researcher in IFTF's Technology Horizons program. Mathias has written extensively about changing patterns of urban mobility, the future of education, and using games to change real world behaviors. He has participated in research into the technological forces that are contributing to changing structures of community support; the nature of collaboration, especially as it is practiced in open source communities and by youth; and the future of mobile communications devices. Mathias has also been integrally involved in development of the Foresight Engine, IFTF's platform for massively collaborative thought experiments that address provocative scenarios about the future.
  • Jim Crutchfield is Professor of Physics at the University of California, Davis, where he is helping to start up its new Center for Computational Science and Engineering. Until recently he was Research Professor at the Santa Fe Institute, where he ran the Dynamics of Learning Group, and Adjunct Professor of Physics in the Physics Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Before coming to SFI in 1997, he was a Research Physicist in the Physics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, since 1985. He also has been a Visiting Research Professor at the Sloan Center for Theoretical Neurobiology, University of California, San Francisco; a Post-doctoral Fellow of the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science at UCB; a UCB Physics Department IBM Post-Doctoral Fellow in Condensed Matter Physics; a Distinguished Visiting Research Professor of the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and a Bernard Osher Fellow at the San Francisco Exploratorium.
  • John Cumbers is the founder of SynBioBeta, a network for synthetic biology startup companies. He runs conferences, introductory courses in synthetic biology, a news digest and a podcast series. The goal of SynBioBeta is to support the fledgling industry and to help new startups partner and raise capital. John also works at NASA Ames Research Center in the synthetic biology program where he works on mission design, space resource utilization, life support and food production. John has a Ph.D in Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry from Brown University and a MS.c in Bioinformatics from the University of Edinburgh.
  • Beatriz DaCosta is an Associate Professor of Arts, Computation, Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. A former collaborator of Critical Art Ensemble and a co-founder of Preemptive Media, she works at the intersection of contemporary art, engineering, politics, and the life sciences.
  • Sharon Daniel is an Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media and Chair of the Digital Arts and New Media MFA program at the University of California, Santa Cruz where she teaches classes in digital media theory and practice. Her research involves collaborations with communities that focus on the use and development of information and communications technologies for social inclusion.
  • Marcy Darnovsky is the Executive Director of the Center for Genetics and Society, a public affairs organization working to encourage responsible uses and effective societal governance of new reproductive and genetic technologies. She speaks and writes widely on the politics of human biotechnology, focusing on their social justice and public interest implications. Her articles have appeared in The Nation, Democracy, Harvard Law and Policy Review, The American Interest, Alternet, Science Progress, The Journal of Life Sciences, Modern Healthcare, Contraception, Bioethics Forum, Tikkun and many others. She has appeared on dozens of television, radio, and online news shows and has been interviewed and cited in hundreds of news and magazine articles. She has worked as an organizer and advocate in a range of environmental and progressive political movements, and taught courses at Sonoma State University and at California State University East Bay. Her Ph.D. is from the History of Consciousness program at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
  • Joe Davis is an artist-researcher who has been at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for 29 years. He has been a Research Fellow and Lecturer at MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies and for most of the past two decades, he has been a Research Affiliate at MIT Biology in the laboratory of Alexander Rich. Joe is noted as a pioneer in the field of art and molecular biology. He was the 2008 recipient of a Rockefeller Fellowship in New Media and has widely published in both artistic and scientific venues.
  • Terrence Deacon, Professor of Biological Anthropology and Neuroscience at the University of California at Berkeley, Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology from Harvard University and formerly a neurologist and anthropologist at Harvard Medical School, is the author of the seminal book "The Symbolic Species: The Coevolution of language and the brain" (2007). His research combines Neurolinguistics, Evolutionary Biology, Anthropology, Semiotics and Complex Systems Theory. His work extends from laboratory-based cellular-molecular neurobiology to the study of semiotic processes underlying animal and human communication, especially language.
  • Dave Deamer is Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He recently published First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began (University of California Press, 2011). Deamer also co-edited Origins of Life with Jack Szostak, published by Cold Spring Harbor Press, 2010. Deamer's research focuses on molecular self-assembly processes related to the structure and function of biological membranes, and particularly the origin and evolution of membrane structure. In collaborative work with colleagues at NASA Ames, Deamer showed that photochemical reactions simulating those occurring in the interstellar medium give rise to soap-like molecules that can self-assemble into membrane structures. This confirmed earlier studies in which Deamer demonstrated that microscopic vesicles were produced by similar molecules present in carbonaceous meteorites. These results led to a new hypothesis about how primitive forms of cellular life could appear on the early Earth, which will be described in his talk.
  • Abigail DeKosnik Abigail De Kosnik is an Assistant Professor in the Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM) and the Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies (TDPS). She has written two books: The Survival of Soap Opera - Strategies for a New Media Era (essay collection, co-edited with Sam Ford and C. Lee Harrington) from the University Press of Mississippi and Illegitimate Media - Minority Discourse and the Censorship of Digital Remix Culture from the University of Georgia Press. She testified before the US Copyright Office at their hearings regarding the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, in favor of an exemption to the DMCA's ban on the circumvention of digital copyright technologies that would allow non-Film Studies college professors to rip DVDs for the purpose of screening clips of film and television in their courses. She organized a conference on Open Source and the Humanities, sponsored by the Berkeley Center for New Media.
  • Bonnie DeVarco is an interdisciplinary researcher, writer and curator and Media X Distinguished Visiting Scholar. With an academic background in cultural anthropology, dance ethnology and archives management, she writes and lectures on Design Science, virtual worlds, next generation geographic information systems, information visualization and the culture of cyberspace. She is currently co-authoring Shape of Thought, on the history and evolution of visual language with Eileen Clegg and is co-editing a book on Ludic Cartographies with Matteo Bittanti and Henry Lowood of the Stanford University's Humanities Lab.
  • Jennifer Dionne is an assistant professor in the department of Materials Science and Engineering. Her research investigates metamaterials - engineered materials with optical and electrical properties not found in nature - for applications ranging from high-efficiency solar energy conversion to bioimaging. Jen received her Ph. D. in Applied Physics in 2009 at the California Institute of Technology and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in 2003. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral research fellow in Chemistry at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her work has been recognized with a NSF CAREER Award, AFOSR Young Investigator Award, Hellman Faculty Scholar Award, and MRS Gold Award. In 2011, she was named one of Technology Review's TR35 - 35 international innovators under 35 tackling important problems in transformative ways.
  • Brad Drda is the environmental manager for Recology San Francisco. He manages energy efficiency and renewable power projects at Recology San Francisco facilities and is an adjunct instructor at the University of San Francisco's Environmental Management program.
  • Carina Earl has shown her work in various galleries in Washington DC. During a brief time in Philadelphia she asked to lead and execute a mural with the Philadelphia Mural Arts Commission and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. In San Francisco she has been deeply involved with Trickster Arts Salon which has presented opportunities to show at Mission Control and Aspect Gallery. She has also shown numerous times at the Diego Rivera Gallery in N. Beach, presented a solo show at Hive Mind Gallery in Oakland in 2011, and exhibited several pieces at SFAI's Vernassage in 2012. Carina began a serious interest in art when she received her first canvas and paint set in 1986. She has always felt that through painting she has been able to access portals into other times and dimensions. Currently she is working on a body of large scale paintings called Labyrinth of Infinite Doorways which focuses on a period about 4 billion years from now when the Milky Way will merge with neighboring Andromeda. Her concepts are based on a principle that intention is stronger than fear, that life is a structural component of physics, and that eventually life will penetrate both star systems to form a galactic biosphere.
  • Robert Edgar is a digital media producer presently living in the Bay area. Robert creates and employs software engines to examine mediated artifacts forged at his zone of proximal development. His engines include Memory Theatre One (1985), Living Cinema (1988), Sand, or How Computers Dream of Truth in Cinema (1992), Memory Theatre Two (2003), and Simultaneous Opposites (presently under development). He holds an MFA from Syracuse University College of Visual and Performing Arts, presently works at Stanford University, and teaches at the Art Institute of Sunnyvale.
  • John Edmark teaches design, color theory, and animation at Stanford University. His creative investigations range from geometric kinetic works and transformable objects, to products for storage, kitchen, and creative play. Previously, he researched 3-D virtual environments at Bell Laboratories. He has Masters degrees in Product Design (Stanford), and Computer Science (Columbia), and is named inventor on nine U.S. utility patents. His other interests include hyper-stereo landscape photography, ultra-light backpacking, and throat singing.
  • Rachel Beth Egenhoefer is an artist, designer, writer, and educator. Her work explores the intersections between textiles, technology, and the body on historical, constructional and conceptual levels; and often incorporates tactile elements such as candy, knitting, and machines to represent intangible computer codes and conceptual spaces. Egenhoefer is currently an Assistant Professor in Design in the Department of Art + Architecture at the University of San Francisco.
  • Ken Eklund is a game designer and a thought leader in the area of serious games and collaborative gameplay for the social good. He is the creator of World Without Oil, a landmark massively collaborative alternate reality game, and currently team lead on EVOKE, "a ten-week crash course on changing the world." Ken has long been interested in the positive social effects of games and open-ended, creative play. Ken and his partner on ZOROP, Annette Mees, both seek ways to use technology to create new narrative forms and experiences - he approaches it as a game designer, she is a director of immersive theater in London. Both believe "participation through play can make stories more personal, meaningful and adventuresome."
  • Mona El Khafif is an Associate Professor of Architecture and Urban Design and Project Coordinator of the CCA URBANlab, who holds a doctorate in urban design from the TU Vienna. El Khafif worked in architectural offices in Germany and Vienna, on projects which received important urban design awards including the Otto Wagner Urban Design Award for the BUSarchitecture Homeworkers project and the Ortner & Ortner Museumsquartier. El Khafif is a founding principal of phase 1 Fox_El Khafif_Nuhsbaumer, a co-author of URBANbuild local global, and has recently published Staged Urbanism: Urban Spaces for Art, Culture and Consumption in the Age of Leisure Society in Germany.
  • Hasan Elahi is an assistant professor at San Jose State University's CADRE laboratory for New Media. He is an interdisciplinary artist whose work examines issues of surveillance, simulated time, transport systems, borders and frontiers. His work has been presented in numerous exhibitions at venues worldwide.
  • Mark Feldman is a scholar of US culture and a lecturer in Stanford University's Program in Writing and Rhetoric, with interests in urban studies, environmental humanities, ecocriticism, and visual culture. In 2009-10 he was a fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center, pursuing initial research for "Urban Ecology: New York City's Visionary Urbanism." "Urban Ecology" explores how artists, landscape architects, and educators are reimagining New York City, greening the streets and changing perceptions of nature. A native New Yorker, this project stems from his long-standing fascination with this city and environmentalism. Mark's first book manuscript ("Still Wild: The Human and the Animal in American Literary Naturalism") reconsiders literary naturalism's preoccupation with animality, arguing that it was part of a serious and modern attempt to rethink what it meant to be human in an evolutionary age. Mark teaches "The Rhetoric of Urban Life" (an introduction to thinking and writing about cities) and "Speaking About Art: Narrating the Cantor's Collections." Mark also directs, along with John Peterson, a sustainability blog, SUSSingSustinability@Stanford that fosters creative communication (written and visual) of environmental issues.
  • Jeanne C Finley, a Professor of Media Studies at the California College of the Arts, is a media artist who works in experimental and documentary forms including film, video, photography, installation, internet, and site specific public works. Her work has been exhibited in international institutions including the Guggenheim Museum, SF and NY Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum and the George Pompidou Center. She has been the recipient of many grants including a Rockefeller Media Arts Fellowship, Guggenheim Fellowship, Cal Arts/Alpert Award, National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships. Since 1989 she has worked in collaboration with John Muse on many installation and video projects including Flatland, 2007, Clockwork, 2006, and Catapult, 2005. Finley's film and video credits include: Lost, 2006, Loss Prevention, 2000, O Night Without Objects, a Trilogy, 1998, A.R.M. Around Moscow , 1993, Involuntary Conversion, 1991 and Nomads at the 25 Door, 1991. These tapes have won awards at international festivals such as the San Francisco, Atlanta, Berlin Video Festival, Toronto, and World Wide Video Festival.
  • Peter Foucault creates works on paper, videos, and installations that are fueled by his love of drawing and mark making. He has created a series of Drawing-Projects, which utilize systems developed by the artist that produce complex abstract compositions. Viewer interactivity plays an integral part in his drawing installations, large-scale artworks in which participants influence the outcome of a drawing that is created by a small robot over the duration of an event or exhibition. Foucault has participated in numerous exhibitions nationwide and has curated several art events.
  • Anne Fougeron has provided architectural services in the Bay Area since her graduation from the Masters program in Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley 25 years ago. Currently her firm's work ranges from feasibility studies to new construction projects in the commercial, health care and residential sectors. Some of her major projects include: the two phase remodel of Planned Parenthood MacArthur Clinic started in 1996 and completed in 2003 (winner of several awards), a 2005 award-winning vacation house in Big Sur, mixed-use housing developments and urban planning studies, and supervising the redevelopment effort for San Jose's downtown area. Fougeron has taught architectural design to both undergraduate and graduate students at the University of California, Berkeley and at the California College of Arts.
  • Curt Frank is a Professor in Chemical Engineering at Stanford and the Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs in the School of Engineering. He was the founding Director of the Center on Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies, a Materials Research Science and Engineering Center sponsored by the National Science Foundation, from 1994 to 2010. He was also the Chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering from 2001 to 2006. His research interests are in polymer materials science, and he has current collaborations with the School of Medicine directed at development of an artificial cornea and toward hydrogel-based arrays for study of primary hepatocytes, with Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source on the development of proton and anion exchange membranes for fuel cells, and with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering on developing bio-based composites and foams for applications in the construction industry. In collaboration with his wife Sara Loesch-Frank, a calligrapher, artist, and art teacher, Curt has taught an Introductory Sophomore Seminar on "Art, Chemistry, and Madness: the Science of Art Materials" for the past six years. Curt lectures on a series of historical palettes: Paleolithic, Egyptian, Greco-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Industrial, and Contemporary.
  • Loren Frank is a Professor in the Center for Integrative Neuroscience and the Department of Physiology at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his Ph.D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and did post-doctoral research at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital before joining the faculty at UCSF in 2003. His research seeks to understand the nature of memory, and has provided critical insights into how memories are stored and how memories are used to guide decisions. His findings have established a causal link between a specific pattern of brain activity and memory, and he and his colleagues are currently developing new tools that will make it possible to study and interact with memory processes throughout the brain. His long term goal is to understand these processes well enough to develop approaches to treating memory-related problems including learning disabilities and Alzheimer's disease. He has received numerous awards for his scientific discoveries and his mentoring, including fellowships from the Sloan, McKnight and Merck foundations as well as the the Society for Neuroscience Young Investigator Award, the UCSF Faculty Mentoring award, and the College Mentors for Kids Inspire Award.
  • Edward Frenkel is a professor of mathematics at UC Berkeley, author, and filmmaker. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society, and the winner of the Hermann Weyl Prize in mathematical physics (2002). Frenkel's new book "Love and Math" was a New York Times bestseller, has been named one of the Best Books of the year by both Amazon and iBooks, and is currently being translated into 14 languages. Frenkel has also co-produced, co-directed and played the lead in the film "Rites of Love and Math," which French newspaper Le Monde called "a stunning short film... offering an unusual romantic vision of mathematicians."
  • Laurie Frick draws from neuroscience to construct intricately hand-built works and installations to explore the nature of pattern and the mind. Formerly an executive in high-technology, using her background in engineering and high-technology she explores science, compulsive organization and the current culture of continual partial attention. She has been awarded fellowships and residencies at Yaddo, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, The Amerian Academy in Rome, McColl Center for Visual Art, The Lower East Side Printshop, Djerassi Fellowship and the Headlands Center for the Arts. The body of work from her Spring 2011 show at Edward Cella in Los Angeles are experiments in brain rhythm using time studies of daily activity logs and sleep charts. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Frick lives and works in Austin, Texas and Brooklyn, New York.
  • Ellen Fullman is a composer and performer based in Berkeley, California. Born and raised in Memphis, Tennessee, as a teenager she became inspired by the sounds native to her region: Delta blues music. At the age of one, she was kissed by Elvis, who said to her, "Hi-ya baby!" Fullman studied sculpture at the Kansas City Art Institute where she learned of the work of Harry Partch. Inspired by Alvin Lucier's Music on a Long Thin Wire, she suspended long wires in her loft studio in St. Paul, Minnesota and experimented with different forms of manual articulation. Through an accidental discovery of the longitudinal mode of vibration, in 1980 Fullman invented the Long String Instrument, which has remained at the core of her creative life. The process of refining and articulating this instrument has led her to experimenting with wire alloys and gauges; designing resonators and tuning capos; creating a graphic notation form that defines time by distance walked; and the study of natural tuning and North Indian vocal music, among many other things, in her quest to "Let the strings sing their own song." She has recorded extensively with this unusual instrument and has been the recipient of numerous awards, commissions and residencies including: The DAAD Berlin Residency (2000) and Center for Cultural Innovation Investing in Artists Grants for Artistic Innovation (2013) and Artistic Equipment and Tools (2008). Releases include: Through Glass Panes (Important), Fluctuations, with trombonist Monique Buzzart‚ (Deep Listening) and Ort, recorded with Berlin collaborator J”rg Hiller (Choose Records). For more info go to: www.ellenfullman.com
  • Linda Gass is an Artist in Residence at the Palo Alto Cubberley Studios. Textiles have been an important part of her life since childhood when her grandmother taught her to sew doll clothes. In her early adult life, she took a detour through the software industry. Linda returned to making textiles 14 years ago, this time for the wall, and now exhibits her work internationally in galleries and museums. She is an avid backpacker and travels extensively in the wilderness areas of the West where she finds much of the inspiration for her work.
  • Evelyne Gayou is a researcher and electroacoustic composer with a master degree in cinema and a PhD in musicology at the Sorbonne. She is editor in chief of the collection "Portraits Polychromes" books and multimedia documents for INA in Paris. Involved in audiovisual activities as an editor for Radio France for many years, she also performs in concert and lectures at universities. As a GRM member since 1975 she has had the opportunity of collaborating with the experimental musical milieu in Europe, from Pierre Schaeffer to Karlheinz Stockhausen, and in the USA especially with the computer music pioneers, Max Mathews, John Chowning, and many others. She published a history of the discovery and development of Musique Concrete under the title "GRM, Groupe de Recherches Musicales, 50 ans d'histoire" (2007).
  • Eri Gentry is the founding President and Executive Director of BioCurious, the Bay Area's first bio-hackerspace, where members come to think and create in a collegial, informal setting. Her mission is to make positive change in the world by enabling innovation in science through collaboration and education. Eri serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of SynBERC and is a Citizen Science blogger at MAKEzine. She enjoys forex trading, sailing, and swinging kettlebells. Eri was previously CEO of Livly, a nonprofit biotech on a mission to cure cancer, and received a bachelor's in Economics at Yale.
  • Margot Gerritsen is the Director of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University. She launched a program at her department called "ICME Artiste" to bring art into the working areas with the goal to show how art and math can impact and stimulate each other. Initial exhibitions featured Francois Miglio, Alison Holt, and Michael Scott. Originally from the Netherlands, she escaped in 1990 to search for hillier and sunnier places. She received a PhD in Scientific Computing from Stanford University in 1996 and joined Auckland University, New Zealand, as a faculty member. In 2001 she returned to Stanford's Department Energy Resources Engineering. Since 2010, she is the director of the Institute for Computational & Mathematical Engineering at Stanford. Her research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods including applications to petroleum engineering, search algorithms and coastal ocean simulation that are extremely challenging because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. She teaches both energy-related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) and mathematics for engineers. She also initiated a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries. She also teaches at Bergen University in Norway and she contributes as editor to the Journal of Small Craft Technology.
  • Zann Gill started her career as a researcher for Buckminster Fuller. Early interest in Fuller's concepts for "World Game" to achieve environmental sustainability and "design science" sparked her focus on cross-disciplinary innovation, including a networked system of urban innovation as a complex adaptive system. She moved to Australia in 1989 to work on a proposal from the Japanese government to the Australian government to build an IT "city of the future", the so-called Multifunction Polis (MFP). At NASA she developed plans for an Institute for Advanced Space Concepts (IASC), a collaboratory BEACON (Bio-Evolutionary Advanced Concepts) and the astrobiology program for NASA University. Zann is currently working with Australia's National ICT Center Excellence (NICTA) to reposition the "eco-sustainable city of the future" initiative to harness smart systems technology, ubiquitous computing, and social networks.
  • David Glowacki is a Royal Society Research Fellow presently based in San Francisco. He holds joint appointments at Stanford University and the University of Bristol (UK). With a Master of Arts in cultural theory and a PhD in chemical physics, he has a growing international reputation spanning both computational nano-physics and interactive digital art, with a growing number of high-profile publications in both areas. David is also the creator of danceroom Spectroscopy (dS), an interactive digital framework that fuses his multi-disciplinary interests, which has been used to create a dance piece entitled Hidden Fields. dS has been displayed at leading European cultural institutions, including Germany's ZKM Centre for Art and Media, London's Barbican Arts Centre, and the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. For more information, see www.glow-wacky.com
  • Ken Goldberg is an artist and professor of engineering at UC Berkeley, where he is currently Director of the Berkeley Center for New Media. Goldberg's art installations such as the Telegarden have been exhibited. Goldberg is an IEEE Fellow and Vice President of Technical Activities for the Robotics and Automation Society. His PhD is in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University.
  • Christian Gonzenbach is an experimenter and an explorer at the edge between the normal and the bizarre. It is the unexpected, the little weird thing, that the artist focuses on. Hence he has created installations in which a landscape is made out of corn flakes, a video in which all the people are pickles, that play soccer, go for a dance or a boxing match, etc. His works look familiar but always disorient the viewer.
  • Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley. She is an internationally recognized leader in the study of children's learning and is the author of over 100 articles and several books including the bestsellers "The Scientist in the Crib" and "The Philosophical Baby; What children's minds tell us about love, truth and the meaning of life". She has also written for Science, The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, New Scientist and Slate. She has three sons and lives in Berkeley, California.
  • Deborah Gordon is a Professor in the Department of Biology at Stanford. She studies collective organization by investigating the ecology and behavior of ant colonies, including a population of harvester ant colonies in Arizona, the invasive Argentine ant in northern California, and ant-plant mutualisms in tropical forests in Central America. She is the author of two books, Ants at Work (2000) and Ant Encounters:Interaction Networks and Colony Behavior (2010). She has been awarded fellowships from Guggenheim and the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences. She is interested in analogies between ant colonies and other distributed networks such as brains, the immune system, the internet, and distributed robotic systems.
  • Sean Gourley, Quid co-founder and CTO, did research into the mathematics of war for his PhD thesis at Balliol College, Oxford. His findings appeared as the featured article in "Nature" (December 2009) and were the subject of a popular TED talk (2009). His work on statistical analysis, probability, and algorithm development applied to complex systems and large datasets inspired the creation of Quid. Sean is a Rhodes Scholar PhD in Physics (Complexity) from the University of Oxford; his is undergraduate degree in Physics is from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
  • Laura Granka is a User Experience Researcher at Google, Inc, and is working towards her PhD at Stanford University. She has spent the past seven years studying how people look for information, specifically in online search environments. Laura has approached information discovery through several research methodologies, including the behavioral (eyetracking), the implicit (clickthrough data), and the qualitiative (ethnography). Laura has applied these key learnings towards improving UI design and result ranking algorithms while at Google. She has authored over 20 publications and presentations on this topic.
  • John Granzow is a Canadian artist, instrument designer and music researcher. He studied classical guitar with Dale Ketcheson and constructed his first instrument (a flamenco guitar) under the instruction of luthier George Rizsany in Nova Scotia. In 2006 he took began research in auditory perception, completing a Masters of Science in Psychoacoustics at the University of Lethbridge in the lab of Dr. John Vokey. At the Analogous Fields: Arts and Science residency at the Banff Centre in 2009 John explored instrumentation in artistic and scientific practice with artist Denton Fredrickson. A generative construction process was devised to produce a series of daxophones from a single plank of cherry, each instrument undergoing an imposed mutation with timbral consequences. These daxophones were played in networked performances in Portugal and Italy as well as at The Center For Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University, where John now pursues his Ph.D in Computer Based Music Theory and Acoustics. In more recent research, he investigates applications of computer aided design and digital fabrication to new organologies. Rapid prototyping techniques are leveraged to produce performance-specific musical instruments. Outcomes from this research have been presented at concerts and sound installations in Canada, France, and the United States.
  • Kathelin Gray, artistic director, Theatre of All Possibilities, is known for her wide-ranging interdisciplinary collaborations involving performance, music, science and installations. She is co-founder of October Gallery and Institute of Ecotechnics in London, October Galley in London, Synergia Ranch in Santa Fe, Caravan of Dreams Performing Arts Center in Texas, and more. Theatre of All Possibilities is a 35-year-old international performance and event production company (www.allpossibilities.org). She has traveled all over the world, organised 30 interdisciplinary conferences, been selected as one of the most innovative CEO's by the Tarrytown 100, served on the board of directors to the Biosphere 2 project.
  • Bathsheba Grossman is a mathematical sculptor, instantiating her own designs as well as scientific illustrations as 3D physical objects. She is a pioneer in the use of freeform fabrication in metal for art, as well as 3D laser etching in glass.
  • Minna Harri received an MFA in Performance and Theory from Theater Academy Helsinki in her native Finland, relocated to San Francisco in 2008 via Amsterdam in the Netherlands (2003-2008) and has since created several choreographies in different locations in the Bay Area, as well as danced for choreographers Laura Arrington, Jesse Hewit (Goldie winner 2010) and Macklin Kowal. Her previous projects have included dance: Life Sustenance, Raja, Everything Under Control that represented Theater Academy Helsinki in Warsaw Theater Schools Festival in 2003, singing in the group Calle Real (2003-2006), three solo shows in galleries in Helsinki (1998, 1999, 2001), published articles in Finnish periodicals and by Theater Academy, and co-curating a performance art salon in Helsinki (2003).
  • Rachel Haurwitz is a co-founder of Caribou Biosciences and has been President and CEO since its inception. began researching CRISPR, or what was then a largely uncharacterized prokaryotic immune system, as a graduate student at UC Berkeley. She recognized the broad commercial uses of several of the proteins from the CRISPR system and in response, co-founded Caribou Biosciences. Dr. Haurwitz earned an A.B. at Harvard College in biological sciences, and received a Ph.D. in molecular and cell biology from the University of California, Berkeley.
  • Katharine Hawthorne is a San Francisco based choreographer and dancer working at the intersection of art and science. She has performed with Hope Mohr Dance, Liss Fain Dance, and Ledges and Bones, among others. Her choreography has been presented widely in the San Francisco Bay Area, Minneapolis, Chicago, New York, Belgium, Greece, and Argentina. Katharine holds a B.S. in Physics and Dance, with honors, from Stanford University.
  • Marti Hearst is a professor in the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley. She received BA, MS, and PhD degrees in Computer Science from UC Berkeley and was a Member of the Research Staff at Xerox PARC from 1994 to 1997. A primary focus of Dr. Hearst's research is user interfaces for search.She just completed the first book on the topic of Search User Interfaces and she has invented or participated in several well-known search interface projects including the Flamenco project that investigated and the promoted the use of faceted metadata for collection navigation. Professor Hearst's other research areas include computational linguistics, information visualization, and analysis of social media.Prof. Hearst has received an NSF CAREER award, an IBM Faculty Award, a Google Research Award, an Okawa Foundation Fellowship, two Excellence in Teaching Awards, and has been principle investigator for more than $3M in research grants.
  • Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison are an artist team, emeritus professors from the University of California San Diego, Department of Visual Arts. They are pioneers in the development and evolution of what can be described as ecologically-based art from a systems perspective.
  • Matt Heckert has been working as an engineer, as well as a performance and sound artist, since 1978. He operates his own design-build shop where he does design, fabrication and machining. One of the founding directors of Survival Research Laboratories, he has built robots and designed soundtracks for performances and films. In 1989 he conceived and developed a group of sound producing machines know as the Mechanical Sound Orchestra and toured it in the United States and Europe. Matt is obsessed with making sound-noise-music with the mechanical devices he builds.
  • Taraneh Hemami is an Iranian-born artist who relocated to the USA after the Iranian revolution of 1979. Hemami's work examines the liminality of her existence, of being of two world that are continuously and contentiously at odds with one another. Through her projects she explores personal and collective stories and histories while creating spaces for creative exchange and dialogue.
  • Rhonda Holberton is an interdisciplinary artist. Her recent installation work addresses the circuitry of power and investigates the game-like structures that direct systems of desire and control. The work relies on a displaced scientific/corporate language to question systems of commerce, capitalism, consumption, corporate futures, media, and resource supplies. Recently Rhonda co-organized the Rising Tide Conference, a joint effort between CCA and Stanford to bring together an international gathering of artists, scientists, policy-makers, and business professionals to engage in conversations about the intersections of ethics, aesthetics, and environmentalism.
  • Robert Horn did did not start out to be an artist. He have had several previous careers: political scientist; entrepreneur; CEO; futurist; cognitive science researcher; author. He was a visiting scholar at Stanford University's Human Sciences and Technology Advanced Research Institute (H-STAR) and the author of Visual Language: Global Communication for the 21st Century. His mural work was represented in the first-ever exhibits of information design as a fine art at the Stroom Museum in The Hague and at the Coventry (UK) School of Art and Design in 2000. One of his info-murals - for Nirex, the British government agency that regulates nuclear waste disposal - incorporates the history and future plans of the agency going out twelve thousand years, and hangs in its cafeteria. You can view the Vision 2050 poster and mural.
  • Jesse Houlding has exhibited nationally and locally, including at SFMOMA, Berkeley Art Center, San Diego Institute Museum of the Living Artist, Stanford University, San Francisco State University, Kala Art Institute, the LAB, and Root Division. As a recipient of the 2009 American Psychoanalytic Association Academic Fellowship he spent a year researching psychoanalytic theories relating to his practice. In October of 2011 he became the Print Shop Manager at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley. Jesse was recently interviewed in the art practice interview blog, In The Make http://www.inthemake.net/Jesse-Houlding
  • William Hsu is an Associate Professor at San Francisco State University. His interests are in interactive computer music, computer architecture and performance evaluation.
  • Jeff Hull's aim, As a street artist and guerrilla events producer, was "to infuse more variability and play into the civic realm" and to create opportunities for real cultural exchange in negative urban space. The result was Oaklandish, a decade strong grassroots community arts organization with 21 consecutive "Best of the East Bay" Awards to its credit. Having dabbled in many creative professions, he was not satisfied until he invented his own job; Creative Director at Nonchalance, a hybrid arts consultancy with an expertise in Situational Design. Their mission is to provoke discovery through visceral experience and pervasive play.
  • Suzanne Husky is a French American visual artist that has been living and practicing in the Bay Area since 2000. She obtained my MFA from the Beaux-Art school of Bordeaux, France, spending half of the program duration at CCAC. The socialist ideologies and the rural environment of 1970s France molded her upbringing and became important components of her work. Our intimate relations with plants, animals, the earth, and how we interact together in poetic and political ways, are examined through sculpture, installation, drawing, documentary photography, and film. Problems relating to the exploitation of natural resources, landscape use and globalization are the persistent backdrop of her multimedia practice.
  • Javier Ideami is a Spanish-born multidisciplinary artist and founder of Ideami Studios. With studies in both artistic (Painting, Photography, Filmmaking, Design and Music) and technical fields (Computing Engineering), Javier has been blending the arts and the sciences, being awarded numerous awards for his work across different disciplines. Javier has exhibited his creative work in many galleries in both Europe and the USA. Javier collaborates regularly with artists, architects, engineers and other creative minds in innovative projects around the world. He is one of the founders of the creative group RAN, winner of an award by the Spanish museum of art and technology Laboral. He was also the founder of the Web 2.0 online application Ewidi, an online social network in 33 languages. In 2008 Javier co-founded Flaii, a Silicon Valley startup in the social networking and gaming space. Javier later launched the interactive creative application Posterini. Javier is also an award-winning filmmaker, screenwriter, and director who occasionally works as well on the photography and music of his films. His filmography includes the films: 2011. The Weight of Light (HD), 2010. The Long Goodbye (Red One 4K), 2010. Erase Love (Red One 4K), 2008. La Ultima Cena (HD), 2007 - El Cuadro (HD), 2006 - Magic Mountain (35mm, Dolby Digital), 2005 - The Moontamer, 2004 - Ego. They won awards at the London International Sci-Fi Film festival, at the Ourense International Film Festival, at the Gaudi Prizes in Barcelona, and at the San Francisco International SFShorts Film Festival. He has also won awards for his photography and music He has also produced the illustrated book for children "The Moontamer" (2010).
  • Amy Ione, an international lecturer, painter, and writer, is presently the Director of the Diatrope Institute in Berkeley. She has published several books, most recently Innovation and Visualization: Trajectories, Strategies, and Myths (Rodopi, 2005), and is working on a special issue for the Journal of the History of Neuroscience on Visual Images and Visualization.
  • David Israel received his BA in Philosophy from Harvard College (1965) and his PhD in Philosophy (focusing on Philosophy of Logic, Language and Mathematics) from UC Berkeley in 1973. After nine years in academia, (and that explains why it took so long to finish his PhD) he entered the wonderful world of contract research in Artificial Intelligence, a world in which most contracts are let by DARPA (the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency) and now IARPA (DARPA's much younger sibling in the Intelligence Community). Over the past decade or so, he has been Principal Investigator (PI) of the AQUAINT Project (Advanced Question-Answering for Intelligence; sponsored by ARDA, a predecessor of IARPA); PI of Halo Phase I; Senior Advisor, Halo, Phase II (Halo was focused on representing and reasoning scientific knowledge, e.g., from Intro College Textbooks in Chemistry, Physics and Biology; it was funded by Vulcan Research, a component of Vulcan, founded by Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft); Chief Scientist, CALO Project (DARPA; CALO was inarguably the largest AI research project in history, focused on building personal assistants for "knowledge workers" ); PI, GALE Project, Phase I; co-PI, Phase II (DARPA; focused on machine translation from both text and speech, in Chinese and Arabic); PI, Mobius Project (DARPA; a very large exploration of the possibilities for Machine Reading), Years 1 and 2; Senior Technical Advisor, Bootstrapped Learning Project (DARPA) and PI of the Machine Reading Project (DARPA; the full follow-on to the Mobius exploration).
  • Lucia Jacobs is a cognitive neuroscientist whose research addresses fundamental questions about the evolution of the brain and cognition. The goal of her research is to understand how a mind is created from the building blocks of learning, memory and the causal links among events and how cognitive primitives expand, duplicate, exapt and specialize over developmental and evolutionary time. Jacobs trained in animal behavior (1978 B.S., Cornell), behavioral ecology (1987 Ph.D., Princeton) and neuroscience (postdoctoral positions: Universities of Toronto, Pittsburgh and Utah). She joined the University of California, Berkeley faculty in 1993 and is currently Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience. Academic awards and honors include the 1995 Herbert Spencer Lecture at Oxford, 1999 Prytanean Prize, 2004 Santa Fe Public Lecture and the 2013 Michigan State Distinguished Lecturer in Cognitive Science. Her work focuses on the evolution of spatial navigation and the hippocampus, with studies exploring species, sex and developmental differences in the expression of this trait, culminating in the publication of the 2003 parallel map theory of hippocampal function (Psychological Review). She has published over 40 scientific articles in the field of animal behavior, cognitive psychology and neuroscience and is currently writing a book on olfaction and the evolution of navigation for Princeton University Press.
  • Mark Jacobson is Director of the Atmosphere/Energy Program and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment and Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy. He received a B.S. in Civil Engineering with distinction, an A.B. in Economics with distinction, and an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University, in 1988. He has been on the faculty at Stanford since 1994. His work relates to the development and application of numerical models to understand better the effects of energy systems and vehicles on climate and air pollution and the analysis of renewable energy resources. He has published two textbooks of two editions each and over 120 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles. He received the 2005 American Meteorological Society Henry G. Houghton Award for "significant contributions to modeling aerosol chemistry and to understanding the role of soot and other carbon particles on climate." He co-authored a 2009 cover article in Scientific American with Dr. Mark DeLucchi of U.C. Davis on how to power the world with renewable energy. He is also on the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Advisory Committee to the U.S. Secretary of Energy.
  • Elizabeth Jameson's fascination with medical imaging and brain scans has a personal basis. Diagnosed with the disease of multiple sclerosis, She found herself confronting stark images of her brain that seemed equally frightening and mesmerizing. In tackling this contradiction, s he reinterpret ed these images and used them to explore the amazing biological structure of the brain. Her current artwork saturates these cold, two-dimensional computerized pixels with rich colors that transform scientific images into portraits of individuals with all the frailties, humor, and idiosyncrasies that make us human.
  • Terry Johnson has a master's degree in chemical engineering from MIT and is currently teaching Bioengineering at UC Berkeley. He hopes that by doing so, he will be giving students the tools that they will need to repair him as he gets older. He teaches courses in a wide range of subjects, displaying a versatility that has prevented him from achieving any actual expertise. In 2010 he received the Golden Apple Award for Outstanding Teaching, and was one of the recipients of Berkeley's 2013 Distinguished Teaching Awards. He is also co-author of the popular science book "How to Defeat Your Own Clone (and other tips for surviving the biotech revolution)."
  • Shamit Kachru (Stanford) is a Professor of Physics at Stanford University and at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. He obtained his A.B. from Harvard University in 1990 and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1994. He was a Research Associate at Rutgers University in 1996-1997. He became an Assistant Professor at the University of California at Berkeley in 1997, and moved to Stanford in 1999. He was also a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton in 1999. Dr Kachru won an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship in 1998, the Bergmann Memorial Award in 1999, and a Packard Foundation Fellowship in 2000. In 2008, he was awarded the 2008 American Chapter of the Indian Physics Association (ACIPA) Outstanding Young Physicist Prize "for fundamental contributions shedding light on the nature of string theory ground states, and on the origin of dark energy in string theory, leading to an accelerating universe." Dr. Kachru is interested in the physics of string theory and M theory. His previous work has focused on stringy modifications of geometry, duality and exact results in supersymmetric compactifications, and supersymmetry breaking. Most recently, he has been doing research at the interface between string theory and cosmology.
  • Rebecca Kamen's work explores the nexus of art and science. Her recent large- scale sculpture installation, Divining Nature: An Elemental Garden has been informed by wide ranging research into chemistry, cosmology, spirituality and philosophy. She has also investigated rare books and manuscripts at the libraries of the American Philosophical Society and the Chemical Heritage Foundation, utilizing these scientific collections as a muse in the creation of her work. She has exhibited and lectured both nationally, and internationally in China, Hong Kong, and Egypt. She has been the recipient of a Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Professional Fellowship, a Pollack Krasner Foundation Fellowship, a Strauss Fellowship, and a travel grant fellowship from the Chemical Heritage Foundation. Her work is represented in many private and public collections such as, KPMG Peat Martwick Corporation, Gannett Corporation, IBM, Capital One and the Institute for Defense Analysis.
  • Drue Kataoka is a visual artist based in Silicon Valley. Artworks integrate Asian brush painting techniques with mirrors, time dilation and brainwave (EEG) data. New art forms developed by Drue are Magic Boxes and Membranes. Has done numerous corporate and private commissions, and collaborated with over 20 organizations. Featured at the first art exhibit in zero gravity at the International Space Station. Has presented at the Annual Meetings in Davos (thrice) and in Dalian & Yangon. Solo Art exhibition in the Congress Center in Davos in 2012. Recent work also featured on CNN, CBS, ABC, Barrons, Wired Magazine and others. Since 2001, has endowed the Drue Kataoka Art Scholarship for Youth. Young Global Leader, World Economic Forum. Recipient of numerous awards including the Martin Luther King, Jr Research & Education Institute Award for extensive community service. Co-founder of Aboomba.com, the destination for Intelligent Style, integrating art, science and social responsibility with fashion.
  • Cosmo Kichman, nee Dr. Daniel Grupp, is a well-published and patented nanotechnology physicist and entrepreneur. Prior to making art, he was most recently a Visiting Scholar at Stanford in the Electrical Engineering department. His transistor technology is currently being developed at Sematech. He has always sought to maintain a sense of play, evident in activities from costuming to fire performances, to scientific innovation, and now to sculpture. His current work will be on exhibit and visitors can participate in creating art while he is the Artist in Residence for the month of March 2009 at the de Young Museum in San Francisco.
  • Catherine King, Executive Producer at Global Fund for Women, has a passion for the power of media and the arts to create awareness and action on social justice issues. As Vice President of Exhibitions and Programs at the International Museum of Women from 2007-2014, she was responsible for developing award-winning online media projects, social media advocacy campaigns, pop-up installations, public programs, and international partnerships. Major projects included Muslima: Muslim Women's Art & Voices, MAMA: Motherhood Around the Globe, Economica: Women and the Global Economy, and Women, Power and Politics. Prior to IMOW, Catherine served for six years as Chief Curator of Exhibitions and Programming for the San Francisco Public Library. Before that she led content development for several of the first online education brands including Dummies.com and HungryMinds.com. In previous positions she directed digital storytelling for emerging mobile media platforms at Visible Interactive and Antenna Audio for clients including the Smithsonian Institution, Lucasfilm, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Catherine has consulted to the Bay Area Video Coalition, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Contemporary Jewish Museum, and was on staff at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She holds a degree in Art History from Smith College and studied at the Universit‚ de Paris (La Sorbonne) and Institut d'tudes Politiques.
  • Shona Kitchen is an international multidisciplinary artist/designer. Graduating in Architecture at the Royal College of Art in London, she continued for several years within the Interaction Design Department, while running her own London-based design partnership KRD (Kitchen Rogers Design) until 2004. Now Residing in California, Kitchen is a parttime professor of Digital Media Art at San Jose State University's "CADRE Lab" and serves as a thesis advisor at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. Most recent works are a multi-site electronic installation DATA NATURE (Hooker & Kitchen) centered at San Jose International Airport, conceptual housing project ELECTROPLEX HEIGHTS (Hooker & Kitchen) part of a touring exhibition commissioned by Vitra Design Museum & Art Center Pasadena, DOMESTIC WILDERNESS CHANNEL (Shona Kitchen) a site-specific exhibition at Montalvo Arts Center, DREAMING F.I.D.S., commissioned for San Jose International Airport, and THE GREEN CORRIDOR for Deptford Creek in East London, a 328-foot long, 10-foot high solar-powered billboard.
  • Walter Kitundu is an artist and designer, instrument builder and photographer. He is a Senior Design Developer for the Studio Gallery at the Exploratorium. In this capacity he helps to design and build environments for learning, develops and facilitates activities, and provides artistic direction. As an artist he has created hand built record players powered by the wind and rain, fire and earthquakes, birds, light, and the force of ocean waves. Walter has performed and been in residence at art centers and science museums internationally. He has performed with the renowned Kronos Quartet, bassist Meshell Ndegeocello, the electronic music duo Matmos, and the legendary Marshall Allen - in venues from Carnegie Hall to a high school library in Egilstaadir, Iceland.
  • Since November of 2011, Margot Knight is Executive Director of the Djerassi Resident Artists Program, her seventh job in the arts and humanities in 35 years. Each position has incorporated the things she loves--history, challenges, artists, scholars, education and access. She has the privilege to oversees one of the foremost artist communities on the planet AND is encouraged to pursue her own literary pursuits. Previous positions include the presidencies of United Arts of Central Florida and United Arts of Raleigh & Wake County, executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts and Washington State University's Oral History Office and staff positions with the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies and Washington Commission for the Humanities. She serves on the Private Sector Council for Americans for the Arts and is a proud recipient of the Michael Newton Award. A frequent consultant, speaker and grants panelist, she has also served on over 25 chamber of commerce, tourism, regional planning and cultural boards, including the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, Visit Orlando, and Florida Cultural Alliance.
  • Randal Koene heads the organization carboncopies.org, which is the outreach and roadmapping organization for action towards Advancing Substrate-Independent Minds (ASIM). Dr. Koene is a neuroscientist and neuroengineer, and he is director of the Analysis team at the nanotechnology company Halcyon Molecular in Silicon Valley. Between 2008 and 2010, Koene was director of the Department of Neuroengineering at Tecnalia, the third largest private research organization in Europe. Dr. Koene has been involved with organized research in artificial general intelligence (AGI) since the first AGI conference in 2008.
  • Fred Kuttner is currently Lecturer in Physics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He holds degrees in physics from MIT and the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is coauthor with Bruce Rosenblum of Quantum Enigma: Physics Encounters Consciousness, published by Oxford University Press.
  • Therese Lahaie studied Fine Art at Emmanuel College and Glass Technology at Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, MA. She is a kinetic sculptor using glass, low rpm motors and LED lighting and also has a background in architectural lighting design. At a 2010 Djerassi Artist Residency she collaborated with NY choreographer Leigh Evans. Their performance installation called "Quite Two Departure," will be premiered at PS. 122 in NYC in July 2010.
  • Miu-Ling Lam is a postdoctoral research fellow at the UCLA California NanoSystems Institute. Her research interests include Robotics, Computational Geometry, Pattern Formation, Complex Systems and Bioinformatics. She received the Best Student Paper Award in the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, the Croucher Fellowship and the Sir Edward Youde Memorial Fellowship.
  • Robert Lang, after a 15-year career doing research and development in semiconductor lasers and optoelectronics, became a full-time origami artist devoted equally to the art of origami and its practical applications. He is the author, co-author, or editor of 9 books on origami and his work has been exhibited in shows worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
  • Patricia G Lange is an Anthropologist and Assistant Professor of Critical Studies at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco. Recognized as an expert in studies of new media and YouTube, her work focuses on technical identity performance and use of video to creatively express the self. Her new book is called Kids on YouTube: Technical Identities and Digital Literacies (Left Coast Press, 2014), which draws on a two-year, deeply engaged ethnographic project on YouTube and video bloggers to explore how video is used in informal learning environments. She also released her ethnographic film, Hey Watch This! Sharing the Self Through Media (2013), which was screened in Paris earlier this year at Ethnografilm, an international film festival showcasing films that visually depict social worlds." Hey Watch This! provides a unique diachronic look at the rise and fall of YouTube as a social media site, and offers a poignant look at how video makers envision their digital legacies. At CCA, she teaches courses in anthropology of technology; digital cultures; new media and civic engagement; space, place and time; and ethnography for design. Prior to joining CCA, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. More information may be found on her websites: https://www.cca.edu/academics/faculty/plange and patriciaglange.org.
  • Wayne Lanier is earned his PhD degree in microbial genetics at the University of Chicago. Wayne professed these, and similar subjects at New York University, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and London Polytechnic. He has been Research Director in Biotechnology and a Consultant in Clinical Studies. Finally, Wayne gracefully retired and now wanders the San Francisco Bay salt marsh, examining the natural history of life at the bottom of the food chain. "Hidden Ecologies" is the title of his program.
  • Sasha Leitman is an inventor, composer, sound artist, and teacher. She is currently the Technical and Projects Manager at the Stanford University Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics where she teaches courses and workshops on interactive sound art.
  • Cheryl Leonard is a San Francisco-based composer, performer and instrument builder. Over the last decade she has focused on investigating sounds, structures and objects from the natural world. Her recent works cultivate stones, wood, water, ice, sand, shells, feathers and bones as musical instruments. Leonard uses microphones to explore the intricate sounds hidden within these instruments and develops compositions that highlight the unique voices they contain. She has also composed numerous soundtracks for film, video, dance and theater, and created sounds for museum exhibits Her commissions include works for Kronos Quartet, Illuminated Corridor and Michael Straus.
  • Caroline Lewis and Robert Davis are Artists in Residence at the Montalvo Arts Center. Caroline Lewis is a lecturer in Social Science teaching, Psychology, Sociology and Social Policy. She trained as a Psychologist at University of Wales and University of London, where she followed a masters program in Counselling and Psychotherapy. She is currently leading a multi disciplinary team from San Jose State University (SJSU) as part of the San Jose Climate Clock Initiative. Robert Davis is a software developer, engineer, and artist who currently works as Systems Developer at Goldsmiths College, University of London. For the last sixteen years he has been actively involved in research in the field of Psychology and Artificial Intelligence. He has also created interactive installations with particular emphasis on ways in which adaptive systems interact with each other, whether biological or mechanical in substrate.
  • Sydell Lewis is a painter and printmaker. Educated in chemistry, she conducted biomedical research as a mass spectrometrist before becoming a fulltime artist. Her background in science and dance is reflected in her work with its juxtapositions of hard edge rendering and sensual organic forms. In 2005 She pioneered the concept of "Rotating Paintings" to enable viewers to fully comprehend a 2 dimensional abstract work of art. As a printmaker, she was one of the first proponents of the new technique of acrylic monotypes. She is a member of the California Society of Printmakers. Her work has been shown in Los Angeles and the Bay Area in numerous galleries and venues including the San Francisco Arts Commission and Triton Museum. Her work is in numerous private and corporate collections on both coasts.
  • Darlene Lim is a research scientist at the NASA Ames Research Center and is the Principal Investigator of the Pavilion Lake Research Project (www.pavilionlake.com). She has conducted field work from the Arctic to the Antarctic and specializes in limnology (study of freshwater) and geobiology.
  • Sara Loesch-Frank is an exhibiting artist and educator working in the Bay Area. Her work has been included in the book, " Art and Craft of Hand Lettering," " Writing Beyond Words," and Letter Arts Review magazine. Her work has been shown at the Southern Highland Craft Guild in Asheville N.C. and at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. Along with Chinese artists, Sara exhibited her work in Chengde and Qufu, China in a joint exhibition. Filoli Gardens and the Triton Museum of Art have often shown her artwork. Sara team teaches a Sophomore Seminar Series at Stanford University: "Art Chemistry and Madness: the Science of Art Materials." in Chemical Engineering with her husband.
  • Tania Lombrozo is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as an affiliate of the Department of Philosophy and a member of the Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Harvard University in 2006 after receiving a B.S. in Symbolic Systems and a B.A. in Philosophy from Stanford University. Dr. Lombrozo's research aims to address foundational questions about cognition using the empirical tools of cognitive psychology and the conceptual tools of analytic philosophy. Her work investigates explanation and understanding, conceptual representation, categorization, social cognition, and causal reasoning. Recent projects have focused on the role of explanation in learning and how explanations guide inference, with related strands of work in both children and adults. Dr. Lombrozo is the recipient of numerous early-career awards including the Stanton Prize from the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, the Spence Award from the Association for Psychological Science, and a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, as well as a James S. McDonnell Foundation Scholar Award in Understanding Human Cognition. She is also the Psychology Director for a project funded by the Templeton Foundation on "Varieties of Understanding: New Perspectives from Psychology, Philosophy, and Theology," which will begin in the summer of 2013, and she blogs about psychology, philosophy, and cognitive science at Psychology Today and for NPR's 13.7: Cosmos & Culture.
  • Bernie Lubell's interactive installations have evolved from his studies in both psychology and engineering. As participants play with his whimsical wood machines, they become actors in a theater of their own imagining. Since the early 1980's his installations have been shown in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, Florida, China and Europe. "A Theory of Entanglement" and other large scale installations were recently featured at FACT, Liverpool, UK and v2 in Rotterdam, NL., and "Party of the First Part" in Paris, France. Recent awards include a Guggenheim Artists Fellowship in 2011, an Adolph & Esther Gottlieb artists grant in 2009, a Pollack Krasner Foundation Grant in 2002 and an Award of Distinction for Interactive Art from Ars Electronica in 2007. Lubell's work includes a stone age digital computer, a rainstorm of chaos and nostalgia, a phone booth-confessional network, a mechanism to measure Intimacy, room sized simulations of the human heart, the brain and breathing, a giant cooperative knitting machine, and a mechanical computer that allows people to work together furiously to accomplish nothing. For more information see -- http://bernielubell.com
  • Roger Malina is a space scientist and astronomer, with a specialty in space instrumentation and optics, previously Director of the NASA EUVE Observatory at U.C. Berkeley and Director of the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille CNRS. He serves on the Comite National of the French CNRS for astronomy and on the French National Commission on Cosmology. He is also Chairman of the Board of Leonardo/International Society for the Arts/Sciences and Technology in San Francisco and President of the sister association in Paris.
  • Reuben Margolin was raised in Berkeley, California. A love of math and physics propelled him to Harvard, where he changed paths and got a degree in English. He then went on to study traditional painting in Italy and Russia. In 1999 he became obsessed with the movement of a little green caterpillar, and set out to make wave-like sculptures. In 2004 he moved to his current studio in Emeryville and began making a series of large-scale undulating installations that attempt to combine the logic of mathematics with the sensuousness of nature. He has since made about 20 of these mechanical mobiles and shown them internationally. He also makes pedal-powered rickshaws and has collaborated on a couple large-scale pedal-powered vehicles.
  • Margarita Marinova's main research interests are in characterizing extreme environments, and understanding the surface of Mars. She has worked at NASA Ames Research Center on understanding extreme environments and the limits of habitability for Earth life. Margarita received her PhD in Planetary Science from Caltech in 2010, where she examined planetary-scale impacts and their implications for the early history of Mars and the solid Solar System planets. Her research interests focus on understanding interesting processes and features on Mars through simulations and field measurements. Her study sites range from the High Arctic, to the Sahara Desert in Egypt, the bottom of a lake in British Columbia in Canada, Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, and to the Dry Valleys of Antarctica.
  • Christine Marie is an artist and director creating original lo-fi spectacles of large-scale cinematic shadow theater. She seamlessly integrates performers, objects and hand made special effects to elicit connections with concepts, phenomenology and history in emotional and visually stimulating performances. She studied Wayang Kulit traditional shadow puppetry in Bali and is a former member of ShadowLight theater. Christine Marie received an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts in Integrated Media and Theater. She lectures and conducts workshops for theater companies, film studios, universities and schools. She has taught shadow animation at Pixar and consulted for the film, "Me and My Shadow," for DreamWorks studios. Christine Marie is a 2012 TED Fellow. She also directs, designs and edits for film and video design. "Signaling Arcana" will premiere in 2013.
  • Michael Marmor is Professor and past Chair of Ophthalmology at Stanford University. He also teaches in the Bioethics program, and the undergraduate Program in Human Biology. He is a leading expert in retinal physiology and disease, and in studies on the interface of vision and the arts. He has written several books and more than 300 papers, not only about retina but also about vision in art, history, music and sports. A recent article showed simulations of how Degas and Monet might have seen their own work as their eyesight failed. His most recent book is The Artist's Eyes (Abrams, 2009).
  • Christina Mazza is a San Francisco Bay Area artist working primarily with reclaimed materials, creating intricate works of art that focus on the urban byproducts of human life while encourage sustainability and environmental responsibility. She has exhibited at the Boston Center for the Arts, San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, Southern Exposure, Intersection for the Arts, and numerous other venues throughout the Bay Area. Mazza recently completed a residency at Recology's AIR Program in 2010 and the Artist's Studio Program at the de Young Museum in 2009. Her work has also been accepted into The Drawing Center's Viewing Program in NYC. Selected works have been published in an anthology showcasing contemporary Asian American women artists and in Recology's 20th Anniversary publication. Mazza has a BFA in Advertising and Illustration and previously worked 15 years at leading advertising agencies in Dallas, Los Angeles and San Francisco before becoming a full-time visual artist.
  • Jamie McHugh RSME (Registered Somatic Movement Educator) is a fine art photographer and a master teacher of somatics. He has taught body-based work internationally for over twenty-five years to people of all ages. Jamie has been on faculty in the Holistic Health Department at John F Kennedy University since 1991 and at Anna Halprin's Tamalpa Institute since 1988. Jamie divides his time between San Francisco and The Sea Ranch. www.SomaticExpression.com www.NatureBeingArt.org
  • Chris McKay is a Planetary Scientist with the Space Science Division of NASA Ames. His current research focuses on the evolution of the solar system and the origin of life. He is also actively involved in planning for future Mars missions including human exploration. Chris been involved in research in Mars-like environments on Earth, traveling to the Antarctic dry valleys, Siberia, the Canadian Arctic, and the Atacama desert to study life in these Mars-like environments. His was a co-I on the Titan Huygen's probe in 2005, the Mars Phoenix lander mission in 2008, and the Mars Science Lander mission for 2011. He is the deputy program scientist for Constellation - the NASA program for future human exploration of the Moon and Mars.
  • Tom McKeag is the founder of BioDreamMachine, a nonprofit educational institution dedicated to bringing bio-inspired design education to K12 schools (www.BioDreamMachine.org). He established the nation's first public elementary school course in biomimicry in 2006, and still teaches the subject through the State of California's Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) program in the Dixie school district, Marin County, California. Tom teaches bio-inspired design to graduate and undergraduate students at the University of California, Berkeley and the California College of the Arts in San Francisco where he is a Senior Lecturer. He is a member of the Biomimicry Institute's Educational Advisory Board. He writes a regular blog about biomimicry at www.greenerdesign.com.
  • Jeremy Mende is a US designer who lives and works in San Francisco, California. Mr. Mende holds a BA in psychology from UCLA and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art. In 2000 he founded MendeDesign, a creative practice that balances commercial projects with visual research and public art. Mr. Mende is an associate professor of design at the California College of the Arts, and in 2010-11, he was the Rome Prize Fellow in Design at the American Academy in Rome. Before his career as a designer, Jeremy skippered a mail packet off the west coast of Nova Scotia.
  • Helene Mialet has held positions at Cornell University, Harvard University and Oxford University where she ran the program in Science Studies; she has also held post-doctoral fellowships at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin and in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge University under the auspices of the Marie Curie Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship, sponsored by the European Union for extremely promising young scholars. She has published widely on subjectivity, agency, innovation and cognition. Her most recent book is entitled L'Entreprise Cr‚atrice, (Paris: HermŠs-Lavoisier, 2008), which is an ethnographic study of practices and processes of invention in an applied research laboratory in a multinational oil company (Total); this book was a finalist for the Prix ADVANCIA for the best book published in French on Entrepreneurship and Innovation in 2008. She has just completed a new book entitled Hawking Incorporated, Stephen Hawking and the Anthropology of the Knowing Subject (University of Chicago Press, 2012). This work provides an ethnographic study of `abstraction' and formalism, focusing on the case of Stephen Hawking as a means of exploring larger questions having to do with singularity, identity, distributed agency, subjectivity, corporeality (and/or the mind/body problem), socio-technical networks and scientific practice. She is currently working on a new project concerned with the study of new networks of knowledge production and expertise constituted by `laypersons' (e.g., electronic lists organized around specific themes like parents of children with juvenile diabetes).
  • Hana Mori-Bottger is Assistant Professor in the Architecture and Community Design program at USF. She teaches physics, design, structural analysis and construction materials courses for architecture students, and has created the Architectural Engineering Minor program. Hana's research interests involve low-cost structural engineering techniques for earthen structures, such as the use of reinforcement to allow energy dissipation and inherent warning mechanisms during seismic activity.
  • Luke Muehlhauser joined the Singularity Institute in 2011 as a researcher, and was shortly thereafter appointed Executive Director. He has published dozens of articles on technological forecasting, intelligence explosion theory, and the cognitive science of rationality. Previously, he interviewed dozens of scientists and philosophers for his podcast Conversations from the Pale Blue Dot, taught classes for the Center for Applied Rationality, and has worked both as a fashion consultant and as an information technologies consultant. He is currently developing several papers, including a survey of proposals for dealing with superhuman AI.
  • Deborah Munk is the director of the Artist in Residence Program at SF Recycling & Disposal, Inc. and has spent the last eight years working with artists who make art out of garbage. She was the assistant editor of "Parallels and Intersections, Women Artists in California" published by UC Press, in 2002 and is a proud graduate of San Francisco State University with a Masters in Educational Technology focusing on art and media. Deborah also manages the Educational Learning Center at SF Recycling & Disposal where she teaches children and adults the importance of sustainability and recycling.
  • Soraya Murray is an Assistant Professor in the Film and Digital Media Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is also affiliated with the Digital Arts and New Media MFA Program. Murray holds a PhD from Cornell University in the History of Art and Visual Studies, an MFA from the University of California, Irvine, and a BFA from Occidental College. An interdisciplinary scholar focusing on contemporary visual culture, she has particular interest in cultural studies approaches to new media and contemporary art. She has written on a broad array of topics ranging from the impacts of globalization on art to exploring a critical studies of electronic games. Murray's writings are found in publications such as Art Journal, Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, Flash Art, EXIT Express, PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art, Third Text and she is also a contributor to GamesBeat.
  • Vijaya Nagarajan is is an Associate Professor in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies and the Program in Environmental Studies at the University of San Francisco. She teaches courses in Hinduism, Religion and Environment, Spiritual Autobiography of Place, among others. Vijaya received her Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley in South Asian Languages and Literatures, with an emphasis in Art History and Anthropology, and has been teaching at USF since 1997. Her research focus has been on the South Indian women's ritual design tradition of the kolam, an ephemeral ritual art performed daily in Tamil Nadu with rice flour. She has received numerous grants and fellowships including the Fulbright-Hays Dissertation Fellowship, American Institute of Indian Studies, the NEH Chair in the Humanities and the Davies Chair (at USF). Her forthcoming book, Feeding a Thousand Souls: Women, Ritual and Ecology in southern India-the Kolam (Oxford University Press) will be exploring the kolam through various disciplines: anthropology, art history, medieval Tamil literature, and mathematics.
  • Julie Newdoll is a painter who merges life science, mythology and culture. Her artwork has been featured on over 20 journal covers in the last few years, and is in collections world wide, including several universities. Newdoll, who studied microbiology at the University of California at Santa Barbara, and medical illustration at the University of California at San Francisco, runs the "Brush with Science" Gallery in Menlo Park.
  • Kate Nichols is an artist who synthesizes nanoparticles to mimic structurally colored animals, grows artificial skin from microorganisms, and cooks up her own paints, following 15th century recipes. In 2010, Kate was appointed a TED Fellow and was awarded a Jacob K. Javits Fellowship. Kate holds a B.A. in Studio Art from Kenyon College, a M.A. in Visual Studies from UC Berkeley, and an MFA from California College of the Arts.
  • Bruno Olshausen received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Computation and Neural Systems from the California Institute of Technology. He did his postdoctoral work in the Department of Psychology at Cornell University, and at the Center for Biological and Computational Learning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty at the University of California at Davis in 1996, and in 2005 joined UC Berkeley, where he is currently Professor of Neuroscience and Optometry. He also directs the Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience, a multidisciplinary group focusing on building mathematical and computational models of brain function.
  • Steven Oscherwitz is a digital media artist, an art and science historian and an educator who most recently taught "Comparative History of Ideas" at the University of Washington.
  • Bob Ostertag has published 21 CDs of music, two movies, two DVDs, and three books. He has performed at music, film, and multi-media festivals around the globe. His radically diverse collaborators include the Kronos Quartet, avant garder John Zorn, heavy metal star Mike Patton, jazz great Anthony Braxton, transgender chanteuse Justin Bond, and others. He is rumored to have connections to the shadowy media guerrilla group The Yes Men. In March 2006 Ostertag made all of his recordings available as free digital downloads. He has a new book in press about labor organizing in Nevada, and is working on another about the construction of human identities through technology. He is currently Professor of Cinema and Technocultural Studies and Music at the University of California at Davis.
  • Trevor Paglen (U.C. Berkeley) has exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Tate Modern, London; The Walker Arts Center, Minneapolis; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the 2008 Taipei Biennial; the 2009 Istanbul Biennial; the 2012 Liverpool Biennial, and numerous other solo and group exhibitions. He is the author of five books and numerous articles on subjects including experimental geography, state secrecy, military symbology, photography, and visuality. His most recent book, The Last Pictures is a meditation on the intersections of deep-time, politics, and art. Paglen has received grants and awards from the Smithsonian, Art Matters, Artadia, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the LUMA foundation, the Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology, and the Aperture Foundation.
  • Chris Palmer is a Fine Artist who has specialized in traditional and modern geometric art, textile design, traditional ornament and folding. After four years teaching Digital Fabrication in schools of architecture in Chicago (IIT) and the University of Colorado at Boulder he now works with Rob Bell in a design build studio in San Francisco CA. He is a member of an international design team doing architectural ornament in middle eastern styles for the American Institute of Mathematics Research Conference Center in San Jose.
  • Stephen Palmer received his B.A. in Psychology at Princeton University in 1970 and his PhD in Psychology at UCSD in 1975. He has taught in Psychology at UC Berkeley ever since, where he also served as Director of the Institute of Cognitive Studies. He is best known for his research on perceptual organization and his interdisciplinary book, Vision Science: Photons to Phenomenology. He now studies visual aesthetics of color and spatial composition. He has published "Vision science: Photons to phenomenology" (MIT Press, 1999) and "Aesthetic science: Connecting mind, brain, and experience" (Oxford University Press, 2012) as well as dozens of journal articles and book chapters.
  • Annapurna Pandey is a trained sociologist, anthropologist, teaching Cultural Anthropology at the university of California, Santa Cruz since 1995 as well as at San Jose State University since 2006. Born and brought up in Odisha, India, she graduated from Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi and taught Sociology for 7+ years at the Ravenshaw University in Odisha. After her post-doctoral research in Social Anthropology at Cambridge University, she moved to Santa Cruzin 1989. She began teaching in 1995 and resumed her research on Women in Politics and Religion. She started looking into the impact of globalization on Odisha and Odia Diaspora. She also produced a documentary on the experiences of the diasporic Odias in the greater Bay Area titled "Homeland in the Heart" and she is now working on another film, "Giving Life to God: The Installation of Lord Jagannath in the Fremont Hindu Temple". She has collaborated with Prof. James Freeman of San Jose State University on the documentary "The Myth of Buddha's Birthplace" (2012).
  • Jennifer Parker is an Associate Professor of Art and Digital Arts and New Media at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her research is rooted in sculpture, interactive and kinetic art, and cross-disciplinary and collaborative research. Current and past projects explore new methodologies for art making that engage art and science thinking. She is co-founder and director of The OpenLab Network at UCSC and has been working with Barney Hyanes since 2008 developing the SonicSENSE interactive art platform. She has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally. Local venues include Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, SF Camerawork; The Lab; Gray Area Foundation for the Arts; Kala Art Institute; and ZER01:10SJ Biennial.
  • Eric Paulos is the Director of the Living Environments Lab, Co-Director of the CITRIS Invention Lab, and an Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering Computer Science Department at UC Berkeley where he is faculty within the Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM). Previously, Eric held the Cooper-Siegel Associate Professor Chair in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University where he was faculty within the Human-Computer Interaction Institute with courtesy faculty appointments in the Robotics Institute and in the Entertainment Technology Center. Prior to CMU, Eric was Senior Research Scientist at Intel Research in Berkeley, California where he founded the Urban Atmospheres research group. His areas of expertise span a deep body of research territory in urban computing, sustainability, green design, environmental awareness, social telepresence, robotics, physical computing, interaction design, persuasive technologies, and intimate media. Eric received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from UC Berkeley. Eric is also the founder and director of the Experimental Interaction Unit and a frequent collaborator with Mark Pauline of Survival Research Laboratories.
  • Kris Paulsen is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric with a designated emphasis in New Media at the University of California, Berkeley. She received a dual BA in the History of Art and Semiotics from Brown University. Her work focuses on intersections of technology and the arts from the 19th century to the present. She is currently finishing her dissertation, 3Real Time over Real Space: Artists in the Telecommunications Networký- a study of liveness, remote witnessing, and telepresence in the arts from the 1960s to the present.
  • Christine Peterson is the co- founder and President of Foresight Institute, a public interest group that educates the community and policymakers on coming powerful technologies such as nanotechnology. She also serves on the Advisory Board of the International Council on Nanotechnology and the Editorial Advisory Board of NASA's Nanotech Briefs. Her work is motivated by a desire to help Earth's environment and traditional human communities benefit from advances in technology. She coauthored Unbounding the Future: the Nanotechnology Revolution (1991) and Leaping the Abyss: Putting Group Genius to Work (1997).
  • Kavita Philip is Associate Professor at UC Irvine's Program in Women's Studies. Her research interests are in technology in the developing world; transnational histories of science and technology; gender, race, globalization and postcolonialism; environmental history; and new media theory.
  • Frank Pietronigro is an interdisciplinary artist and author, an Associate Fellow at the Studio For Creative Inquiry, College of Fine Arts, Carnegie Mellon University, and the co-founder and director of the Zero Gravity Arts Consortium. In 1998 he pioneered "drift paintings" where his body floated within a three-dimensional painting in zero gravity aboard NASA's KC135 turbojet. The Zero Gravity Arts Consortium, founded in 1999, is a space arts organization dedicated to fostering greater access for artists to zero gravity space through international partnerships with space agencies.
  • Sheila Pinkel is a Professor of Art at Pomona College where she has worked since 1986. She has exhibited and spoken nationally and internationally. Most recently she co-curated the exhibition "In Transition Russia 2008" in Ekaterinberg and Moscow, Russia, and participated in a symposium with this title.
  • Leonard Pitt is an actor, author and teacher. He originally studied mime in Paris with Etienne Decroux in the 1960s and settled in Berkeley in 1970. He has performed and taught around the world. He currently operates The Flying Actor Studio in San Francisco offering a one-year conservatory program in the art of physical theatre. He has written three books about Paris, Walks Through Lost Paris, Paris a Journey Through Time, and Paris Postcards, the Golden Age, plus A Small Moment of Great Illumination about the life of Valentine Greatrakes, a 17th century Irish healer.
  • Martin Pohl is an experimental physicist who has worked on major particle physics experiments at particle accelerators for 35 years, exploring the structure of matter, elementary forces, space and time. He also contributes to space-borne experiments measuring cosmic particles to investigate their nature as well as their sources. He is interested in the contributions of science to culture and its interaction with other cultural activities: "A major point of contact between fundamental physics and the arts ought to be that neither scientists not artists should ever expect anything but the unexpected".
  • June Power has degrees in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley and University College London. She has published numerous research papers in the area of distributed systems and has been invited to speak on this topic at several universities. She is also the co-founder of Altor Systems, a company that has developed, patented and licensed technology for 3D applications, including games.
  • Phillip Prager has recently completed his PhD at the Cambridge University Digital Studio and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Minerva Foundation in Berkeley. His work relates scientific research on creativity and play to the historical and digital avant-garde.
  • Tony Pratkanis studies at Stanford University, specializing in Robotics and Mechatronics. He currently works in the Salisbury Robotics lab. He is also a member of the technical Board of Advisors for Suitable Technologies. Prior to attending to Stanford, he worked at Willow Garage. An eleven-year member of the Homebrew Robotics Club, his robots have been featured at Maker Faire and in the mass media including the CBS morning news, BBC, Servo Magazine, and IEEE Spectrum among others. In addition to robotics, he is interested in software engineering, chemistry, alternative energy and entrepreneurship.
  • Jackie Quinn is a software engineer by trade, and a synthetic biologist at heart. She currently serves as editor for the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) standard and lead for the SBOL Visual working group. She is interested in the development of biology as an engineering and design field, and loves design languages, programming languages, natural languages, and languages of all sorts. Jackie graduated with a B.S. in Engineering from Harvard University in 2012, and has spent the past two years working in Autodesk's Bio/Nano Programmable Matter research group. She has recently transitioned to Google.
  • Paul Rabinow, Professor of Anthropology at U.C. Berkeley, Director of the Anthropology of the Contemporary Research Collaboratory (ARC), and former Director of Human Practices for the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (SynBERC), is the author of "Designing Human Practices: An Experiment with Synthetic Biology " (2012); "The Accompaniment: Assembling the Contemporary" (2011); "Marking Time: On the Anthropology of the Contemporary" (2007); "Anthropos Today: Reflections on Modern Equipment" (2003); "Essays on the Anthropology of Reason" (1996); "Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology" (1993); "French Modern: Norms and Forms of the Social Environment" (1989); and "The Foucault Reader" (1984). A former lecturer at the cole Normale Superieure (1997) in Paris, he was named Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government in 1998 and was awarded the visiting Chaire Internationale de Recherche Blaise Pascal at the cole Normale Superieure for 2001-2.
  • Alan Rath, a pioneer in the field of electronic art, received a BS in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1982. His contributions to the field of contemporary sculpture and new media have received significant acknowledgement worldwide. His work is in such major collections as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN), the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Hara Museum (Tokyo). Rath lives in San Francisco, CA.
  • Gertrude Reagan was born in Washington, DC in 1936, and spent her early years in the Southern Appalachians where her father was doing geology. She moved to California in 1954. In 1956, Gyorgy Kepes' book "The New Landscape" celebrated images from science as art. It validated images like her father's geologic maps as subjects for her work. Myrrh began mining science and natural patterns for art ideas by finding analogs in crafts media for natural patterns. In 1981, she founded YLEM: Artists Using Science and Technology, which held forums and had a publication for 28 years. She now conducts a special interest group in patterns in nature and visual math.
  • Robert Rich has released over 30 albums in the last three decades, mostly instrumental electronic music. He became somewhat notorious for performing all-night Sleep Concerts in the '80s. He studied for a year at Stanford's CCRMA while getting a degree in Psychology, and now tours occasionally, creates sound design for films and electronic instruments, and has begun teaching courses on audio mastering and studio engineering. More at http://robertrich.com.
  • Laura Richard (UC Berkeley) works in Modern and Contemporary Art with a Designated Emphasis in Film. This past Spring she taught a course on Installation Art and last summer her article, "Anthony McCall: The Long Shadow of Ambient Light," appeared in the Oxford Art Journal. Since 2009 Laura has been the co-coordinator of the Townsend Working Group in Contemporary Art at UC Berkeley, whose mission is to foster interdisciplinary and inter-institutional conversations. She is currently writing her dissertation on the early film and room works of Maria Nordman, a portion of which she presented at the UCSD Visual Arts Graduate Student Conference in March.
  • Richard Rinehart is a digital media artist and Digital Art Curator at the UC Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive. He is Associate Director for Public Programs of the Berkeley Center for New Media. Rinehart's papers, projects, and more can be found on his website
  • Kiri Rong graduated from Beijing Institute of Technology as Computer major and began her career as a Cisco network engineer. Soon after, She studied Fashion Design at Beijing's Central Academy of Arts and began her own design business which soon blossomed into her own designer goods factory. While the factory was a great success, Kiri sensed that her true calling lay in the booming Chinese art scene. Kiri soon became the department manager for Modern and Contemporary Art at the Beijing Googut Auction House. In 2009 Kiri moved to the Bay Area and soon opened an art gallery while practicing Digital Art.
  • Phil Ross is an artist, curator, and educator who places natural systems within frames of social and historic contexts. Phil's living artworks are grown into being over the course of several years, integrating traditional manufacturing techniques with practices and technologies from disparate fields. His recent work includes a trilogy of documentary videos on microorganisms, and the growing of a building composed of living fungus. Phil currated an exhibition on biotechnology for the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in 2007, and is the founder and director of CRITTER, a science and art salon located in San Francisco's Mission District.
  • Warren Sack is a software designer and media theorist whose work explores theories and designs for online public space and public discussion. He is Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz and earned a B.A. from Yale College and an S.M. and Ph.D. from the MIT Media Laboratory. Warren's writings on new media and computer science have been published widely and his art work has been shown internationally.
  • David Salesin (Adobe) leads the Adobe Creative Technologies Lab, which he founded when he joined the company in 2005. He is also an Affiliate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he has been on the faculty since 1992. He received an Sc.B. from Brown University in 1983, and a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1991. From 1983-87, he worked at Lucasfilm and Pixar, where he contributed computer animation for the Academy Award-winning short film, "Tin Toy," and the feature-length film, Young Sherlock Holmes. He spent the 1991-92 year as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Program of Computer Graphics at Cornell University. In 1996, he co-founded two companies, where he served as Chief Scientist: Inklination and Numinous Technologies. When the latter was acquired by Microsoft in 1999, he worked as a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research until 2005, while remaining on the UW faculty. He was named a Guest Professor of Zhejiang University and an ACM Fellow in 2002.
  • Tanu Sankalia, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art + Architecture at the University of San Francisco, is currently at work on a book project that examines slots or interstitial spaces in San Francisco-the subject of an exhibition, The Urban Unseen, he curated last February. He teaches classes in architecture, urban design and city planning, and has worked as an architect and urban designer in Mumbai and San Francisco.
  • Piero Scaruffi is a cognitive scientist who has lectured in three continents and published several books on Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science, the latest one being "The Nature of Consciousness" (2006). He pioneered Internet applications in the early 1980s and the use of the World-Wide Web for cultural purposes in the mid 1990s. His poetry has been awarded several national prizes in Italy and the USA. As a music historian, he has published ten books, the latest ones being "A History of Rock and Dance Music" (2009) and "A History of Jazz Music" (2007). He has also written extensively about cinema, literature and the visual arts. An avid traveler, he has visited 121 countries of the world.
  • Victoria Scott strives to understand the transformation of matter and energy as it flows from one state into another. Working with electronic media, sculpture and social relations, she creates site-specific installations, digital prints, objects and audio works. Her recent projects include constructing 3D paper representations of objects that exist both in simulated environments and real life. She is also developing a series of batteries that are charged by human emotional energy. Scott Kildall is a cross-disciplinary artist working with video, installation, prints, sculpture and performance. He gathers material from the public realm as the crux of his artwork in the form of interventions into various concepts of space. Zer01 Artists in Residence.
  • Derek Sears is a teacher and researcher who has spent his career studying meteorites and their relationship to asteroids. He is best known for his application of thermoluminescence to the study of meteorites, but has also worked on water on Mars and the composition and spectral properties of asteroids. For 14 years he was part of the preliminary examination team for Antarctic meteorites and between 1992 and 2002 he was editor of Meteoritics and Planetary Science. He has published three books on meteorites. He is a research scientist at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California.
  • Carlo Sequin has been a professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley since 1977. His research interests lie in the fields of Computer Graphics, Virtual Environments, and Computer Aided Design Tools. He has built CAD tools for the layout of integrated circuits, for the conceptual phase in architectural design, for the design of mechanical systems, and -- most recently -- for artists who create abstract geometrical sculptures.
  • Audrey Shafer (Stanford Univ) is Professor of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine/VA; staff anesthesiologist, Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System; and Director, Arts, Humanities and Medicine Program, Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics http://bioethics.stanford.edu/arts/. Born in Philadelphia, she studied at Harvard, Stanford and the University of Pennsylvania for biochemistry, medicine and anesthesia training, respectively. She is associate editor, Medical Humanities - BMJ and poetry editor, Journal of Medical Humanities. She co-directs the scholarly concentration in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities, teaches creative writing for medical students, and strives to create an environment at the medical school which encourages creative exploration, collaboration and scholarly work in medical humanities. She is a founding member of Stanford Pegasus Physician Writers. Her poetry appears in numerous journals and anthologies and she is the author of The Mailbox (Random House, 2006), a story about posttraumatic stress disorder in Vietnam veterans. "From [the] knockout opening, first-time novelist Audrey Shafer builds a story finely balanced between mystery. and meditation -- on loneliness, love and what a boy really needs to make a life." The Washington Post
  • Shan Shan Sheng has artworks installed in four of the world's tallest buildings, as well as other major works of architecture. Born in Shanghai, Sheng came to United States in 1982 to pursue her academic and artistic interests by attending Mount Holyoke College and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and continued to Harvard University as an artist-in-residence for two years. Now she lives and works in San Francisco. In 1989, she was an official artist for the Asian Art Festival in Chicago. She has spent the last 18 years working in the public art field. She has now completed over 25 large-scale projects in the states of California, Arizona, Massachusetts, Florida, New Mexico, Utah, Ohio, Texas, Oklahoma and the cities of Chicago,Miami, Denver, Nashville, Cleveland and Charlotte as well as the international cities of Shanghai, Beijing, Taipei, Hong Kong, London and Venice. Her public art project "Ocean Wave" at port of Miami was awarded the best public art project by Americans for the Arts in 2007. In 2009, Sheng's artwork "Bamboo Forest" at a high speed train station in Taiwan was awarded the best public art project. Sheng has held over thirty one-woman shows in Europe, Asia and America. Most recently, her "Open Wall" project was included in the 53rd Venice Biennale. In 2010 this project was exhibited at the Shanghai World Expo. Her works appear in selected public collections around the world including Harvard University, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, China National Art Museum, Beijing, Shanghai International Convention Center, Amoco Building in Chicago, Art Museum of South Texas, Berengo Collection, Venice, Italy and Shanghai Art Museum.
  • Katherine Sherwood's acclaimed mixed-media paintings gracefully investigate the point at which the essential aspects of art, medicine, and disability intersect. Her works juxtapose abstracted medical images, such as cerebral angiograms of the artist's brain, with fluid renderings of ancient patterns; the paintings thus explore and reveal, with a most unusual palette, the strange nature of our time and current visual culture. Sherwood's work was exhibited in the 2000 Whitney Museum Biennial and at Yerba Buena Art Center in 2003 and 2009. Among many throughout the USA, Katherine also had a solo exhibition in 2007 at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington DC. She co-curated "Blind at the Museum" at the Berkeley Art Museum, and organized an accompanying conference at UC Berkeley. Sherwood was a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship 2005-2006 and a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant 2006-2007. Katherine is a professor at UC Berkeley in the Art Department and the Disability Studies Program.
  • Danielle Siembieda-Gribben is an Arts Entrepreneur working in the intersection of New Media Art, Sustainability and Community. She practices between genres of Social Practice, Institutional Critique, Intervention and New Media. Most of her work includes an emphasis on the environment and technology. Her most recent project, "The Art Inspector" was incepted in 2009 as a method to reduce the carbon footprint of art. This project has been funded Silicon Valley Energy Watch to conduct energy assessments on artist's studios and take them through an eco-art makeover. She has been an artist in residence at the TechShop SJ where she create a body of work around cyborg politics and the anthropocene. Some of her other roles include being a board member of the Women's Environmental Art Directory; art consultant to the SF Department of the Environment, member San Jose Public Art Advisory Committee; and Fellow Alum at SF Emerging Arts Professionals. Siembieda has a MFA in Digital Media Art at SJSU at the CADRE Laboratory for New Media with a focus on green technologies, sustainable materials. More at www.siembieda.com and www.artinspector.org
  • Sharon Siskin's artwork has been featured in numerous publications and received numerous awards. She was the Artist in Residence at San Francisco Recycling & Disposal, Inc. in the summer of 2004 and has taught at University of San Francisco, the Graduate Department of Arts and Consciousness at John F. Kennedy University, California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco Art Institute, California State University East Bay, University of New Mexico and at several California Community Colleges. She is a long-time board member of WEAD (Women Environmental Artists Directory.)
  • Renetta Sitoy was born in New York, NY and graduated in 2007 with an MFA in Design + Technology from the San Francisco Art Institute, where she was the recipient of the San Francisco Art Institute MFA Fellowship from 2005 to 2007. Using media that include video and animation to examine the human condition, her work has explored topics such as the alteration of time and space, perception, memory, dreams, and the effects of technology on human behavior. Her work has been shown in Atlanta, Baltimore, New York City, Los Angeles, Athens, Greece, Varna, Bulgaria, Budapest, Hungary, and throughout the Bay Area. She is currently working on a documentary about the French born, Oakland based electronic music artist Laetitia Sonami. She lives and works in the Bay Area.
  • Paul Skokowski is a philosopher and cognitive scientist who teaches in Symbolic Systems and Philosophy at Stanford, and runs a research initiative with workshops on consciousness in conjunction with the Stanford Humanities Center. He has been a Visiting Professor in Philosophy at UC Berkeley, McDonnell-Pew Visiting Fellow at Oxford University, Professor of Surfing at Yahoo!, and Director of the Institute for Scientific Computing Research for the UC Livermore Lab. Paul has published in philosophy, physics, cognitive science and computing. Paul received a PhD in philosophy from Stanford and a BA and MA in physics and philosophy from Oxford. His current research interests include consciousness and philosophy of quantum mechanics. Paul is an avid runner and can be found most weekends on trails in the coastal range from the Peninsula up into Marin County.
  • Daniel Small is a Los Angeles-based artist, writer, and researcher. His work has been exhibited internationally and his 2011 project The Circumference is Everywhere was included at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa Japan. His project Third Person Eclipse was shown in the Iraqi Embassy in Pankow Berlin as part of the ongoing project Des Chapitres Du Conflit, a collection of interventions that address and inhabit the former Iraq Embassy to East Germany. In his project Partially Recovered, he resurrected an erased image from a hard drive as a large scale photorealist Jacquard tapestry that will be exhibited in the Gruuthuse Museum that houses the largest collection of tapestries from the 14th and 15th century in Brugge, Belgium where it was produced. Excavation II is a triangulation of past, present and future that proposes a full excavation of the remains of Cecil Demille's 1923 film set of The Ten Commandments that was the largest film set ever built and mimics ancient Egyptian artifacts.
  • Bill Smart is an associate professor of computer science at Washington University in St. Louis, where he works on problems in robotics, machine learning, and brain-machine interfaces. He is currently on sabbatical at Willow Garage, Inc., a very unusual robotics company in Menlo Park. He is currently looking at how to make humans and robots interact more naturally and effectively.
  • Alvy Ray Smith is is the cofounder of Pixar and a pioneer of computer graphics. He was present at Xerox PARC for the invention of the personal computer, then at the New York Institute of Technology where the vision of the first digital movie was conceived, then Lucasfilm, where he was its first director of computer graphics. HIs second startup company was sold to Microsoft, where he was the first Graphics Fellow. He has received two technical Academy Awards, and holds four patents. He created and directed the Genesis Demo in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. The made a short piece with artist Ed Emshwiller, Sunstone, part of MOMA's collection. He hired Pixar's star animator, John Lasseter, and directed him at Lucasfilm in The Adventures of Andre & Wally B. He was responsible at Lucasfilm/Pixar for the Academy-Award winning Disney animation production system CAPS. As a regent of the National Library of Medicine, he helped initiate the Visible Human Project. He helped argue the progressive scan format into the national HDTV standard. He has a PhD from Stanford in computer science and an honorary doctorate from New Mexico State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has published widely in theoretical computer science and computer graphics, and is currently writing a book about the pixel and modern media.
  • Christina Smolke is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Bioengineering. Christina's research program focuses on developing modular genetic platforms for programming information processing and control functions in living systems. She has pioneered the design and application of RNA molecules that process and transmit user-specified input signals to targeted protein outputs, thereby linking molecular computation to gene expression. These technologies are leading to transformative advances in how we interact with and program biology, providing access to otherwise inaccessible information on cellular state, and allowing sophisticated exogenous and embedded control over cellular functions. Her laboratory is applying these technologies to addressing key challenges in cellular therapeutics, targeted molecular therapies, and green biosynthesis strategies. Her research has been recognized with a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, a Beckman Young Investigator Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, World Technology Network Award in Biotechnology, and TR35 Award.
  • Laetitia Sonami is a French-born sound artist and performer. Her sound performances, live-film collaborations and sound installations explore ideas of presence and participation. Her signature instrument, the lady's glove, allows her to control sounds, mechanical devices, and lights in real-time. Sonami also creates sound installation work incorporating household objects embedded with mechanical and electronic components. Although some recordings of her works exist, Sonami generally eschews releasing recorded work. Sonami has given performances and shown installation work in concert venues, museums, and art galleries internationally, including appearances at Ars Electronica (Linz, Austria), the Other Minds Festival (San Francisco), the Interlink Festival (Japan), Lincoln Center Out of Doors (New York), and Internationales Musikerinnen-Festival (Berlin). In 2013, a film about Sonami, ``the ear goes to the sound: The Work of Laetitia Sonami'', was made by artist Renetta Sitoy. Sonami teaches sound art at the San Francisco Art Institute.
  • Sharon Spain serves as curator for Recology San Francisco's Artist in Residence Program. The Program's mission is to educate the public about recycling and resource conservation by enabling artists to make art "at the dump," providing tours to students and adults, and programming off-site exhibitions. Before coming to Recology, Spain was the associate director of the Asian American Art Project at Stanford University, the managing editor of Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (Stanford University Press, 2008), and a contributor to the de Young Museum catalog, Asian/American/Modern Art (2008). She has worked for the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery and San Francisco State University Fine Arts Gallery.
  • Tami Spector is a Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of San Francisco and serves on the Board of Leonardo. She has a strong interest in the intersections of chemistry and art and aesthetics and has published a number of papers related to these topics. She is currently serving as a guest editor for an on-going special section of Leonardo on nanoscience/technology and art and welcomes comments and/or submission on this topic from the audience.
  • Kal Spelletich is the founder of Seemen, an interactive machine art performance collective, has collaborated with Survival Research Labs and countless others from rock bands to scientists, politicians, NASA, Hollywood television and filmmakers. For 28 years he has been experimenting with interfacing humans and technology to put people in touch with intense real life experiences and to empower them. Kal's work is always interactive, requiring a participant to enter or operate the piece, often against their instincts of self-preservation. He works on the waterfront of San Francisco scouring junkyards and dumpsters for industrial items whose technology can be reapplied. He curates art exhibits and is involved in political activism.
  • Julianne Stafford was the co-founder of a private consulting firm for investing in natural resources and have a long and varied musical backgrounds in classical and popular music. Stafford also perform with the Left Bank trio and Fiume di Musica.
  • Cindy Stokes is a photographer and systems biology consultant living and working in the Bay Area. She focuses closely on the curious details of the world, having fun with structural and spatial complexity and ambiguity in her abstracts and still-lifes.
  • David Stork is Rambus Fellow and directs research in the Computational Sensing and Imaging Group at Rambus Labs in Sunnyvale CA. A graduate in Physics from MIT and the University of Maryland, he's held faculty positions in Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Statistics, Electrical Engineering, Psychology, Neuroscience and Art and Art History variously at Wellesley and Swarthmore Colleges and Clark, Boston and Stanford Universities. He has lectured on computer image analysis of art over 250 venues in 14 countries, including major museums such as the Louvre, National Gallery London, National Gallery Washington, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, van Gogh Museum, and Venice Biennale, and has published widely on the subject including as co-editor of the first three volumes on computer image analysis in the study of art. He delivered the 2011 C. P. Snow Memorial Lecture celebrating scholarly work spanning the arts and sciences. He is author of the second edition of Pattern classification, co-author of Seeing the Light: Optics in nature, photography, color, vision and holography. He holds 42 US patents and is a senior member of both the Optical Society of America and IEEE as well as a Fellow of the International Association for Pattern Recognition (IAPR), of the International Academy, Research and Industry Association (IARIA), and of SPIE.
  • Dawn Sumner is a geobiologist interested in how early life evolved on Earth and whether or not Mars may have once hosted microbial life. She explores life in many different ways, ranging from describing the ancient remains of bacteria from remote areas on Earth to characterizing modern bacterial communities living in ice-covered Antarctica lakes to helping run the Curiosity rover on Mars to developing virtual representations of data for improved scientific interpretations. Dawn has several active collaborations with artists that integrate scientific data with novel implementations of visualization technology. In these collaborations, the merged artistic and scientific visions provide unique insights that benefit both the aesthetic and technical understanding of the natural world. Dawn is based in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Davis, where she has been a professor since 1997.
  • Melanie Swan is the principal of MS Futures Group, a futurist, hedge fund manager, and founder of citizen science organization DIYgenomics. Her educational background includes an MBA in Finance and Accounting from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and a BA in French and Economics from Georgetown University. Melanie enjoys kick-boxing, independent film, and international travel.
  • Leila Takayama is is a research scientist at Willow Garage, studying human-robot interaction. She holds a PhD and MA in Communication from Stanford University (2008) as well as BAs in Psychology and Cognitive Science from UC Berkeley (2003). The work she is presenting is from her doctoral dissertation on Throwing Voices: Investigating the Psychological Effects of the Spatial Location of Projected Voices, which won the Nathan Maccoby dissertation award. http://www.leilatakayama.org
  • Nomi Talisman is an Israeli-born artist who earned her MFA and photography, video and electronic arts from Mills College. She has exhibited her work in four continents. She was chosen to be the first artist to be working on a new series of online works commissioned by the Magnes Museum in Berkeley (2008-09).
  • James Thompson is a graduate from the Design Program of Stanford University. James Thompson holds an AS in engineering from Shepherd University and a BS in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia.
  • An award-winning author, filmmaker and new media consultant, Andrew Todhunter did undergraduate work in the humanities at the American University of Paris, received his BA in Ancient History from UC Berkeley and later studied film production at NYU's Graduate Department of Film and Television. He is the author of three books, including the PEN USA Literary award-winning A Meal Observed, and dozens of articles for national publications including National Geographic, The Atlantic and The Wall Street Journal, among others. He has worked on numerous film projects, including productions for Lucasfilm and National Geographic Television. Todhunter teaches writing at Stanford University through the Department of Biology and the Program in Writing and Rhetoric, and co-directs The Senior Reflection, a creative capstone course series for scientists in the arts.
  • Jonathan Trent is the lead scientist on Project OMEGA (Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae)-a system to produce microalgae for biofuels, food, and fertilizer, while treating wastewater, sequestering carbon, and promoting environmentally sustainable aquaculture. Jonathan has conducted research in microbiology and molecular biology at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Germany, the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, the University of Paris (Orsay) in France, and at the Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine at Yale Medical School in the USA. He moved to Argonne National Laboratory to study environmental bioremediation, before going to NASA Ames Research Center, where he is currently working. At NASA he has contributed in the fields of Astrobiology and Bio-Nanotechnology and, in 2007, he founded GREEN (Global Research into Energy and the Environment at NASA), which ultimately led to Project OMEGA. In addition to his position at NASA, Jonathan is an Adjunct Professor in the Engineering Department at UC Santa Cruz and a Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences.
  • Meredith Tromble is an artist and writer whose areas of interest include creative process and interdisciplinary research. She is the author of Art & Shadows, a series of essays on contemporary in light of contemporary research, funded by the Art Writers Grant Program of the Andy Warhol Foundation. In addition to her work as an Associate Professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at the San Francisco Art Institute, she is currently collaborating with Dawn Sumner of the University of California, Davis on a virtual installation, Take Me Me To Your Dream (Dream Vortex).
  • Danielle Tullman-Ercek is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California Berkeley. Danielle received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, and her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. She carried out her postdoctoral research at UCSF and the Joint Bioenergy Institute prior to joining Cal in 2009. Her research focuses on building protein-based devices for applications in bioenergy, biomaterials, and drug delivery. She is particularly interested in engineering the cellular machinery that transport materials across membranes. She is a member of the Berkeley Synthetic Biology Institute and the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center, and was recently awarded an NSF CAREER award for her work on the construction of bacterial organelles using protein membranes.
  • Niki Ulehla is a San Francisco based artist, puppeteer and goldsmith. Originally from Tennessee, she lived in Texas, Alabama, Germany, Georgia, Massachusetts and the Marshall Islands before coming to California in 1997. She studied painting at Stanford, puppet-making in Prague and goldsmithing in San Francisco. She worked as a goldsmith in the studios of Petra Class and Sandra Enterline for five years and has had her own studio since 2005. She has been making and performing with marionettes for over a decade in the SF bay area and Czech Republic. She began performing in San Francisco with the puppet-music ensemble, Cows for Tuttle and later began developing shows in collaboration with musicians and composers. Currently she is further developing a version of Dante's Inferno that she began as an artist in residence at Recology (the dump) in San Francisco. In addition she has been exploring the possibilities of Small Shows, performing experiments in small scale and microscopic puppetry using projection.
  • Liena Vayzman s hybrid practice incorporates photo-based and curatorial projects. Vayzman co-curated "Chance Operations" and "Night Light: An Evening of Luminous Environments". She organized "Captured Accidents: Valencia Street Live," an interactive media project by digital artist Tim Thompson at Artists Television Access (ATA) and "HOME: The Aesthetics and Politics of Home in Contemporary Art" at Root Division. Vayzman started the bands Jerk Alert and I Like Action! and is currently at work on "The Lemon Tree Project, a yearlong photographic and narrative collaboration with a fruit tree in Oakland CA, and a book project on food and agriculture in contemporary art. In 2008-09, she taught in the Photography Program at San Jose State University.
  • Victoria Vesna (UCLA) is a media artist, professor at the department of Design & Media Arts at the UCLA School of the Arts, director of the UCLA Art & Science center and the UC Digital Arts Research Network. Her work explores how communication technologies affect collective behavior and how perceptions of identity shift in relation to scientific innovation. Victoria has exhibited her work in solo exhibitions worldwide, and is the recipient of many grants, commissions and awards. Her most recent installations (Blue Morph, Mood Swings and Water Bowls) aim to raise consciousness around the issues of our relationship to natural systems. She published an edited volume, "Database Aesthetics: Art in the age of Information Overflow" (2007), and is co-authoring "Context Providers: Conditions of Meaning in Media Arts" (2010).
  • After an extensive career in strategy and business consulting for the technology industry, for the past several years Gian Pablo Villamil has been working with notable artists to bring to life complex technology-based artworks.
  • Indre Viskontas straddles the line between music and neuroscience, holding a Master of Music degree in Voice Performance from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience from UCLA. An affiliate of the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF, she continues to publish research related to memory and creativity. An active Bay Area performer, she is the co-founder and Director of Opera on Tap: San Francisco, an opera company whose mission is to change the perception of opera as elitist and stuffy by producing high quality performances in unusual venues. She is also the co-founder and leader of Vocallective, a collective of singers and instrumentalists dedicated to the art of vocal chamber music. Passionate about bringing science to the public, she co-hosted a 6-episode docuseries on the Oprah Winfrey Network called Miracle Detectives, in which she represented the scientific side of a believer-scientist team investigating real claims of miracles. She continues to educate and provoke the lay public via her blog (www.indreviskontas.com/blog/blog.html), as a host of the podcast Point of Inquiry (http://www.pointofinquiry.org/) and via public speaking appearances.
  • Wayne Vitale is a composer, performer, author, teacher, recording engineer, and instrument conservator in the field of Balinese music. He is the director of Gamelan Sekar Jaya (www.gsj.org), an ensemble of sixty musicians and dancers that has achieved an unparalleled international reputation for its cross-cultural creative work. As a composer, he has created numerous works for gamelan that have directly impacted the evolution of Balinese kebyar music. His recording label, Vital Records (www.vitalrecords.ws), releases critically acclaimed CDs of Balinese music. He has also devoted himself to the metallic art of gamelan tuning, grinding and filing his way throughout the US and Europe to restore Balinese instruments.
  • Mark Wagner is a digital and traditional artist, and educator. Wagner moved from art school at Pratt Institute in Brookln NY to the high desert plains of New Mexico in the mid 80's. He's been involved in Native American Indian ceremony for over 30 years. He has been involved in the film industry as a concept artist and consultant, in addition to his work as graphic designer, illustrator, author, musician, and fine artist. He is currently working with the Smithsonian Institution, Museum of Natural History where the Paleo Indian department is featuring his artwork throughout their new web site. Wagner worked at Pixar Studios on the new Disney feature film John Carter, and has worked on other films; Terminator 3, DreamKeeper, and The Book of Stars. Wagner is also an internationally know street painter and chalk drawing artist. He founded the 501(c)3 nonprofit Drawing on Earth that inspires art and creativity in youth and communities around the world. Their first project set a Guinness World Record for the largest chalk drawing. Their current project is an Global Illustrated Story.
  • Birgitta Whaley was born in England and moved to the US following an undergraduate degree in Oxford University. She received her Ph. D. from the University of Chicago in 1984 and was appointed to the faculty at the University of Berkeley, California in 1986, where she is now Professor of Chemistry, Director of the Berkeley Quantum Information and Computation Center, and senior faculty scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Fellow of the American Physical Society and former chair of the APS Division of Chemical Physics, her honors include Kennedy and Sloan Foundation fellowships, an Alexander von Humboldt research award, a Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science Professorship at Berkeley, and senior Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin (2012-2013). Advisory activities include committees for the National Academy of Sciences, the scientific advisory board for the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics. Her research is broadly focused on quantum information and quantum computation, control and simulation of complex quantum systems, and quantum effects in biological systems.
  • Steve Wilson is a San Francisco author, artist and art professor who explores the cultural implications of emerging technologies and scientific research. His interactive installations & performances have been shown internationally in galleries and art shows. He won a Rockefeller New Media Fellowship and the Prize of Distinction in Ars Electronica's international competitions for interactive art and several honorary mentions. He is also author of many books and articles including Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology. (MIT Press, 2002)
  • Ian Winters is an SF video/media artist working at the intersections of performance, architectural form, and technology and time-based media to explore the complex relations between physicality, technology, and place, often in collaborations with composers and choreographers to create both staged and open-ended media environments through performance, visual and acoustic media. Winters trained in photography, video/film and performance at SMFA-Boston and Tufts University, and post-graduate training in architecture.Full bio at www.ianwinters.com/bio.html.
  • Andrea Stevenson Won (Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab) received the MS degree in biomedical visualization from the University of Illinois, Chicago, in 2005. She is currently working toward the PhD degree at the Department of Communication, Stanford University. Her research interests include mediated self-representation and capturing, assessing and manipulating body movements to affect outcomes.
  • Kathrine Worel is a visual artist and curator, she earned her MFA from the San Francisco art institute in New Genres. Her work has been exhibited throughout the Untied States, China, Italy and Spain as well as being held in numerous private collections. She is a SECA Award nominee and has been awarded residencies from Kala Art Institute and The Garage and will soon be relocating to Tokyo, Japan to explore living in the future.
  • Imin Yeh (San Francisco, CA) is fresh off of an Irvine Fellow at the Lucas Artist Programs of Montalvo Art Center. She is a recipient of the 2009 Barclay Simpson MFA Award, the San Francisco Foundation's Murphy and Cadogan Fellowship (2008) and the Yozo Hamaguchi Endowed Scholarship in 2007. BA, University of Wisconsin, Madison; MFA, California College of the Arts.
  • Stella Zhang was born in Beijing, China. She learned painting from her father the acclaimed brush painter Ping Zhang who was a professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts. She attended the Central Academy of Fine Arts for high school. She then matriculated to the Central Academy of Fine Arts for college where she received her BFA in Chinese Brush Paining in 1989. She moved to Japan in 1990 where she studied Japanese Painting at Tama Fine Art University and later at Tokyo Art University where she earned her MFA in Japanese Painting in 1996. She has lived in the United States since 2003. In the past 20 years, her work has been exhibited in Chinese, Japanese and American galleries and museums. Her work has been included in fine arts collections in many countries. She has published four books.
  • Thomas Zimmerman is an inventor and educator, exploring the frontiers of human-computer interaction at the IBM Almaden Research Center. His 30+ patents cover position tracking, user input, wireless communication, music training, biometrics and encryption. His Data Glove invention established the field of Virtual Reality, selling over one million units. His electric field PAN invention, developed with Professor Neil Gershenfeld at the MIT Media Lab, sends data through the human body. He also founded and directs the Extreme Science Program at the Latino College Preparatory Academy (LCPA) in East San Jose.

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